California State Military Department
The California Military Museum
Preserving California's Military Heritage
California and the Civil War
2nd Regiment of Cavalry, California Volunteers
 
Introduction to the The Second Regiment of Cavalry
Extracted from Records of California Men in the War of the Rebellion, 1861 To 1867. 1890.
Transcribed by Sandy Neder.

This regiment was organized under the President's second call upon the State for troops, for which see page 12. The call was dated Washington, August 14, 1861, and by October 30, 1861, the regiment was organized and mustered into the service.

The companies were first assembled at Camp Alert, San Francisco, which was located on the ground now enclosed by Mission, Folsom, Twenty-fourth, and Twenty-sixth Streets, then known as the Pioneer Race Track.

The first Colonel of the regiment was Andrew J. Smith. His record in the army is as follows: Born in Pennsylvania; Cadet United States Military Academy, July 1, 1834; graduated, and appointed Second Lieutenant First United States Dragoons, July 1, 1838; First Lieutenant, March 4, 1845; Captain, February 16, 1847; Major First Cavalry, May 13, 1861; Colonel Second California Cavalry, October 2, 1861; resigned November 13, 1861; Lieutenant-Colonel, Fifth United States Cavalry, May 9, 1864; Colonel Seventh Cavalry, July 28, 1866; Brigadier-General of Volunteers, March 17, 1862; Major-General, May 12, 1864; honorably mustered out of volunteer service, January 15, 1866; resigned his rank in regular army, May 6, 1869; reappointed Colonel United States Cavalry, January 5, 1889; retired January 25, 1889. General Smith took part in all the great battles in the West.

Columbus Sims was the second Colonel of the regiment, and served as such from November 13, 1861, to January 31, 1863. He was succeeded by Colonel Geo. S. Evans, from February 1, 1863, to May 31, 1863, when he resigned. He was afterwards elected State Senator, and served three terms as such. He was appointed Adjutant-General of the State May 1, 1864, and served in that office until April 30, 1868. Edward McGarry was Colonel of the regiment from November 29, 1864, to the muster out of the regimental organization, March 31, 1866.

After completing the organization of the regiment, and a short period for drill and discipline, the regiment was sent, by companies, to various stations.
Regimental headquarters went first to Utah Territory, and after remaining there until October, 1864, was removed to Camp Union, near Sacramento, and remained there until the final muster out of the regiment as an organization, in March, 1866.

Company A went first to Fort Churchill, Nevada, then to Utah Territory, where it remained until December, 1864, when it took station at Camp Union, Sacramento, about which time the terms of service of most of its members expired and the company was reorganized by reenlistment of many of its old members and the enlistment of recruits enough to fill up the company to the required number. In September, 1865, it marched to Fort Miller, in Fresno County, and in November 1865, it marched to Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, where it remained until ordered to Camp Union, near Sacramento, for muster out, in April, 1866.

Company B was ordered to the southern part of the State, and became part of Carleton's "California Column," and marched with that command to New Mexico. In the spring of 1864 it returned to California, and was mustered out as a company at San Francisco, October 10, 1864. The company that performed the above mentioned service was under command of Captain John C. Cremony. After the muster out of the original Company B, a new Company B was organization, and Captain Cremony having been promoted Major, George D. Conrad became Captain of the company. The new company remained at Camp Union, Sacramento, until June, 1865, when it moved to Dun Glen, Nevada, where it served until mustered out in the spring of 1866.

Company C served at Fort Crook, Humboldt County, California, nearly the whole of the time it was in the service. When the terms of its original members expired in the fall of 1864, they were mustered out at Fort Crook, and the company was filled up by enlistment of recruits in San Francisco. It was finally mustered out at Sacramento in May, 1866.

Company D, after leaving Camp Alert, went to Camp Independence, in Owens River Valley, remaining there until August, 1863; then to Fort Tejon, Kern County, California, until March, 1864, when it moved to Camp Union, where the original members were mustered out, upon the expiration of their respective terms, during the months of September and October, 1864. The company was then reorganized by Captain W.L. Knight, and after serving a short time at Camp Union, Sacrament, and Camp Jackson, in Amador County, went to Colusa; then to Red Bluff, and finally, in July, 1865, to Smoke Creek, Nevada, where it remained until ordered in to be mustered out at Camp Union, May 29, 1866.

Company E, after leaving Camp Alert, went first to Fort Humboldt, Humboldt County, remaining there until the spring of 1862. No record of the stations of this company can be found from February, 1862, until April, 1863, at which time it was at Camp Independence, Owens River Valley. During July, 1863, it went to Fort Tejon, and in August, 1863, to Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, where it remained until November, 1865. The original members were mustered out in San Francisco, October 6, 1864. After leaving Camp Babbitt the company was stationed again at Camp Independence, until it was ordered to San Francisco to be mustered out, which took place June 2, 1866.

Company F was organized in Sacramento, and was first called the "Sacramento Rangers." After the completion of the organization at Camp Alert it was stationed at various places, having served at Camp Union, Fort Bidwell, Bear Valley, Cal., Fort Crook, Smoke Creek, Nev., and Goose Lake, Cal. About one third of the company, under a Lieutenant, was kept in San Francisco as a provost guard most of the time that the company was in the service. This company furnished a large number of officers for other companies and regiments of the California Volunteers, fourteen of the enlisted men having been commissioned as officers from it. The terms of service of the original members having expired, they were mustered out at San Francisco, September 24, 1864; the company was again filled up, and was finally mustered out at Sacramento, June 27, 1866.

Company G, after its organization at Camp Alert, was sent to Camp Drum, where it remained about a month; then went to Camp Latham, near Los Angeles. There is no record showing how long it remained at Camp Latham, nor of the time between February 28, 1862, when it was at the latter place, and April 30, 1863, at which time it was stationed at Camp Independence, Owens Valley. During August, 1863, the company moved to Camp Leonard, Cal., where it remained for two months; then went to Fort Tejon, remaining three months; thence to Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, where it remained from January, 1864, to August, 1864, taking up the march for San Francisco to be mustered out. The original members were mustered out during the months of September and October, 1864. The company was again filled up, and was stationed at Camp Union from October, 1864, to March, 1865; then it was in camp near Hornitos, Mariposa County, for one month; then at Camp Union until February 1, 1866, when it was finally mustered out.

Company H, after organization at Camp Alert, was sent to Fort Churchill, Nevada, where it was stationed during the months of January and February, 1862. There are no records of the stations of this company from February 28, 1862, until April 30, 1864, when we find it stationed at Camp Relief, U.T., and from May to August, 1864, at Camp Conness, I.T., and at Camp Douglas, U.T., during September, 1864. The terms of service of most of the original members expired during the months of September and October, and they were mustered out at Camp Douglas. The remaining men were marched to Camp Union, Sacramento, where the company was recruited up, and remained on duty there during the months of December, 1864, January, February, and March, 1865; on provost guard duty in the City of Sacramento during the months of April, May, June, July, and August, when it was ordered to Drum Barracks, Los Angeles County, arriving there about October 1, 1865, where it remained until its final muster out, April 20, 1866; a detachment, however, seems to have been stationed in San Francisco, where it was mustered out at the Presidio, April 26, 1866.

Company I was organized at Camp Alert. It was sent first to Camp Drum, where it was stationed during January, 1862, and at Camp Latham, near Los Angeles, in February, 1862. From February, 1862, to April, 1863, there is no record. On April 30, 1863, the company was at Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, where it remained until January, 1864; it then marched to Benicia Barracks, where it was stationed during March, April, and May; thence to Camp Bidwell, near Chico, where it remained from June, 1864, to May, 1865. During June and July it was en route to Camp McDermit, Nevada, where it remained until it was ordered in for final muster out at Sacramento, June 24, 1866. The terms of most of the original members expired in September, and they were discharged in San Francisco from October 1 to October 7, 1864.

Company K was at Camp Alert until February 28, 1862. There is no report showing when the company left that post nor where it served for more than a year. We find it next at Fort Ruby, Nev., March 31, 1863; it was then stationed at Deep Creek, U.T., Government Springs, U.T., Cedar Swamp, U.T., Fort Ruby again, Farmington, U.T., and Camp Douglas - about a month in each place. It was stationed at Camp Douglas from November, 1863, until April, 1864; it then moved to various places: Camp Relief, U.T., Canon Creek, I.T., Camp Conness, I.T., Farmington, U.T., and Camp Douglas again, arriving at the latter place about the last of September, 1864, where nearly all of the original members were mustered out for expiration of terms. The company was again recruited up and served at Camp Union, Cal., to June 30, 1865, and at Fort Churchill until May 1, 1866, when it was marched to Camp Union, Cal., and finally mustered out May 18, 1866.

Company L was at Camp Alert until March, 1862, from which time until April 30, 1863, no record can be found of the localities occupied by the company. During that month it was in camp at Bishop Creek, Owens River Valley; during May, 1863, at Camp Independence, same valley; June, at Fort Churchill, July, at Fort Ruby, both in Nevada; August, en route to Salt Lake, and from that month to March, 1864, at Camp Douglas, near Salt Lake City. During the next four months it was at various places in succession, as follows: Rush Valley, March, 1864; Camp Relief, April; Camp Conness, May; Bingham Creek, June; and back to Camp Douglas for the next two months; then at Fort Bridger, Wy. T., for five months; then to Fort Laramie, Wy. T., for a few months; then in Rush Valley, U. T., to May, 1866, and finally back to Camp Douglas for final mustered out on July 12, 1866. The terms of service of the original members expired in September and October, 1864, and they were mustered out at Camp Douglas, where the company was reorganized.

Company M was at Camp Alert until the spring of 1862, from which time until May, 1863, no record of its stations can be found. From May 1, 1863, to May, 1864, it was stationed at Fort Bridger, Wy. T.; from May until August, 1864, surveying and making wagon road from Salt Lake to head of navigation on the Colorado River, in Arizona, near Fort Mojave, A.T.; from August to November, at Camp Douglas; from November 1864, to May, 1865, at Fort Bridger, Wy. T.; May and June, 1865, at Fort Laramie; July, August, September, October, and November, at various places in Dakota, Wyoming, and Utah Territories; from November, 1865, to May, 1866, at Government Reservation, Rush Valley, U.T.; May and June, 1866, at Camp Douglas, where the company was finally mustered out, July 12, 1866. The terms of service of the original members expired in September and October, 1864, and the company was mustered out at Camp Douglas, October 4, 1864. The company was immediately reorganized by recruiting new members, and it remained in the service until its final muster out, as shown above.

The following events in the history of the regiment are gleaned from various reports, letters, monthly returns, muster rolls, etc. It is regretted that the officers were not required to make returns to the office of the Adjutant-General of the State during the first year they were in the service:

Headquarters Second Cavalry, California Volunteers,
Camp Douglas, Utah, October 31, 1862.

Colonel: Agreeably to your orders, dated Fort Ruby, Nev., September twenty-ninth, to proceed thence on the next day (the thirtieth) with Company H, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, on the northern overland route, via the "City of Rocks," in quest of guerrillas or hostile Indians supposed to have congregated there, I have the honor to report that, having left Fort Ruby on the day specific, I overtook, on the second day's march, Captain S.P. Smith, of the Second Cavalry, who preceded me with his company the day before, and who was encamped in Pine Valley. Here I remained awaiting the return of the Indians who accompanied Captain Smith, and who had been sent out by him to bring in hostile Indians.

Having been informed that fires were seen near our camp, I dispatched Captain Smith with a portion of his company, at night, to learn of them. He returned next morning and reported, "No trace of Indians." On the morning of the fourth we took up the line of march, on the route designated, and arrived at Gravelly Ford on the fifth, without having discovered any Indians. Here, on the seventh, I sent Captain Smith and Lieutenant Darwin Chase with a party of men down the river, and Lieutenant George D. Conrad up the south side of the Humboldt, with instructions to scour the country for hostile Indians or guerrillas, and to report to me, at a place designated, on the north side of the Humboldt, where I encamped on the ninth with the balance of the command. This evening (the ninth) some of the command enticed into camp three Indians; two of them were armed with rifles, and the other with bow and arrows. I immediately ordered their arms taken from them, and placed them under a guard, intending to retain them until the arrival of my interpreter, who was with the detachment under Lieutenant Conrad. A short time after their arrest the Indians made an attempt to obtain their arms, and, having succeeded, they resisted the guard and broke and ran a short distance; they were fired upon by the guard and crippled. Fearing that they would escape, and not wishing to hazard the lives of my men in recapturing them alive, I ordered the guard to fire, and they were killed on the spot. here, on the tenth, Captain Smith joined the command, and reported that he had received no information, nor had he seen any signs of guerrillas or hostile Indians.

On the eleventh I proceeded on the march, having sent out the officers of the command with instructions that if Indians were found to bring them into camp. Captain Smith having been sent in advance, had not proceeded more than ten or twelve miles when he came upon a party of about fourteen or fifteen Indians, who were armed with rifles, bows and arrows. He surrounded them and took from them their arms. Immediately after, the Indians attempted to escape by jumping into the river. They were fired upon and nine of them killed. On the same day Lieutenant Conrad and party brought into camp three Indians and an Indian child. Captain Smith returned in the evening with two squaws. Next day, the twelfth, Captain McLean returned, bringing in one Indian and a squaw. Same day Lieutenant Clark returned with one Indian; another Indian was captured during the evening. The next day, the thirteenth, I told two of the Indians, through the interpreter, that if they would go and bring in Indians who were engaged in the massacre of emigrants I would release them, but that if they did not return that night I would kill all the Indians I held as prisoners in camp. The next morning, the fourteenth, hearing nothing from the Indians I had sent out the day previous, I put to death four of those remaining, and released the squaws and child, telling them that we were sent there to punish Indians who were engaged in the massacre of emigrants, and instructed them to tell all the Indians that if they did not desist from killing emigrants that I would return there next summer and destroy them. On the next day, the thirteenth, I sent Lieutenants Chase and Conrad with a detachment on the south side of the Humboldt, with instructions as before. They came upon a party of Indians encamped in the mountains, armed with rifles, bows and arrows. They were surrounded and their arms taken from them. The Indians, attempting to escape, were fired upon, when eight of their number were killed. The balance of the route no traces of Indians were seen. On the twenty-eighty I arrived at the place designated by you; the next day, at about 3 o'clock P.M., arrived at this camp.

The route is a good one, with an abundance of grass and water. In conclusion, it affords me great pleasure to report the efficiency of the officers, and the good conduct of the men of the command without the loss of any.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,


EDWARD McGARRY
Major, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers.


Col. P. Edward Connor, Third Infantry, California Volunteers, Commanding District of Utah, Camp Douglas, Utah.

Official:
RICHARD C. DRUM,
Assistant Adjutant-General

 Headquarters Second Cavalry, California Volunteers
Camp Douglas, Utah, November 28, 1862.

Lieutenant: I have the honor to report that, agreeable to instructions of the Colonel commanding the district, I left this camp on the night of the twentieth instant and proceeded to Cache Valley, where I arrived about 11 o'clock P.M. on the twenty-second, distance one hundred miles, where I was met by Mr. Van Orman, the uncle of the emigrant boy you ordered me to rescue from the Indians. He informed me that Chief Bear Hunter was encamped, with thirty or forty of his tribe, Shoshones, Snakes, and Bannocks, about two miles distant. I left the horses in the settlement called Providence, in charge of a guard, and started about 1 o'clock for the Indian camp. The night was dark and cold, and we did not find the camp until the morning of the twenty-third. I then divided my command into three parties, under Captain Smith, Lieutenant Conrad, and myself, with instructions to surround the camp and close in upon them at daybreak. I found in a tent two squaws. The Indians had all left that night, as I perceived that the fires in their huts were not extinguished. I then returned to where I had left the horses, at which place I arrived about 7 o'clock A.M. Captain Smith brought in one Indian, caught in trying to escape; I made a prisoner of him. About 8 o'clock a party of mounted Indians, I should think thirty or forty, armed with rifles, bows and arrows, made their appearance from a canon on a bench between the settlement and the hills, about a mile from the settlement, and made a war-like display, such as shouting, riding in a circle, and all sorts of antics known only to their race. I immediately ordered my men to mount, divided them as before, sent Captain Smith to the right, Lieutenant Conrad to the left, and I took the center, driving the Indians into the canon. When I arrived at the mouth of the canon I halted for the purpose of reconnoitering; just at that time the Indians opened fire upon Lieutenant Conrad. I then ordered my men to commence firing, and to kill every Indian they could see. By this time the Indians had possession of the canon and hills on both sides. I found it would be impossible to enter the canon without exposing my men greatly. I therefore reinforced Lieutenant Conrad on the left of the canon, with orders to take the hill on the left of the canon at all hazards. About the time the reinforcements reported to him, Chief Bear Hunter made his appearance on a hilltop on the right, with a flag of truce (as I was informed afterwards); I at the time took it to be a war-like demonstration. A citizen who heard his hallooing came up to me and told me that the chief said they did not want to fight any more. I then ordered my men to cease firing, and him to say to the chief it they would surrender and come in I would not kill them, which terms they acceded to. Chief Bear Hunter with twenty or more of his warriors then came in. I took them into the settlement, took Bear Hunter and four others that I thought to be prominent Indians and examined them (through an interpreter) as to the whereabouts of the white boy, and ascertained that he had been sent away some days before.

I told Bear Hunter to send some of his tribe and bring the boy to me; that I should hold the five as hostages until they delivered him to me. He dispatched three of his men, and they returned the next day about noon with the boy. I then released Bear Hunter and the four others. I killed three and wounded one Indian in the fight. I was told by Bear Hunter that an Indian known as Woeber Tom, alias Utah Tom, communicated the information of our approach. In relation to the emigrant stock I was ordered to examine into and bring to camp, I could not find any such, and from the information I could gather, I am of the opinion that all, or nearly all, of the stock taken by the Indians last summer is now in the Humboldt country. I left Cache Valley on the morning of the twenty-fifth, and arrived at this camp on the afternoon of the twenty-seventh, without the loss or scratch of man or horse. It affords me great pleasure to report to the Colonel commanding the good conduct of the command, and during the fight, which lasted about two hours, the officers and men behaved handsomely.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD McGARRY
Major, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers.


______

Colonel: I have the honor to submit the following inspection report of the troops, public property, and buildings at this post, as required by Special Orders No. 15, Department of the Pacific, January 17, 1863.

In compliance with the above I have carefully inspected and examined into each department. This post is garrisoned by the headquarters and Companies A, H, K, and M, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, and the headquarters and Companies E,G,H, and K, Third Infantry, California Volunteers, both of which regiments have confirmed to the organization prescribed in General Orders No. 126, War Department.

The discipline of the troops is excellent, but their instruction in military exercises is not as good as I would like, which is, however, attributable to the time consumed in the march from California to this post, the time consumed in the construction of cantonments and on detached service, and the inclemency of the season, which has allowed of but few drills in the last eight months. They are, however, well instructed in their other duties; the clothing, arms, equipments, and accouterments of the infantry are in good condition, kept clean, and in good order; their clothing is well preserved, is kept very neat, and is warm and comfortable, though the supply of some articles is nearly exhausted. The kitchen, mess furniture, etc., of the companies is in good order, cleanly and carefully kept, the food well cooked, wholesome and plentiful in quantity. The books, papers, and files neatly kept, and the company funds properly and judiciously expended in the purchase of necessaries for the men.

The quarters or cantonments are thirty-two in number, and are temporary shelters of tents placed over excavations four feet deep, with good stone and adobe fire-places; they are warm and comfortable, capable of accommodating twelve men each, are all dry, well ventilated, and convenient to good water; they are kept clean and in good order.

The quarters occupied by the cavalry companies are constructed in the same manner and are equal in every respect to the infantry in comfort and conveniences. The mess, kitchen, and company furniture is also well preserved, is in good order; the company books, papers, files, etc. kept with system, and the funds fairly and judiciously expended in the purchase of such articles as are needed by the men.

Their clothing is, however, scanty, old, and badly out of repair, much of it quite worn out, having been worn a long time; many of the men are quite ragged, and before a new supply of clothing can be had will be quite destitute.

Their arms, accouterments, and equipments of all kinds need repairs, and some of them are totally unfit for service; their belts are much worn and are nearly worthless; many of the carbines broken and unfit for service and others useless and wanting repairs. Two companies are armed with Whitney rifles, a very unwieldy arm and quite unsuited to cavalry service, being difficult to load or carry on horseback. Many of these are also out of repair, and some of them unfit for use by reason of long service; a large number of the pistols used are also out of repair, and some totally unserviceable, never having been repaired since they have been in use. I also find quite a large number of the Conbien cartridges are too short for those pieces, and some entirely useless.

The horse equipments, excepting the saddles are also in very bad order, having been worn a long time and badly wanting repairs, particularly the bridles and bits; the latter are made of cold iron, are very narrow, chafe the horse's mouth, and are easily broken. The horses are in very good condition as to appearance and keeping, but are generally light and rather small for efficient field service; a few of them are worn out and unfit for use.

The officers' quarters consist of thirteen small buildings, constructed of logs and adobes over ground excavations of from three to four feet deep, and covered with boards, straw, and earth. They have good fire-places, and average four rooms each. The building occupied by the commanding officer is above ground, constructed of adobes, contains five rooms, two of which are occupied as Adjutants' offices. The above are all temporary structures, and only adapted for shelter this winter.

The guard house contains three rooms and a cell; the bake house one room and a large oven. These are also above ground, and are built of stone and adobes; they are substantial structures, and well adapted to the wants of the command.

The Commissaries' and Quartermasters' offices and stores are all under one cover, constructed of paulins stretched over a substantial frame two hundred feet long.

The hospital consists of a small log structure and three hospital tents, rendered warm and comfortable by boards and earth; is in excellent condition, and well arranged for the comfort and convenience of the sick this winter; has good fire-places, and is well supplied with all the medical stores necessary. The sick and wounded receive every attention and all the luxuries the country affords. But little sickness has prevailed at the post.

At this date, owing to wounds and injuries received on the march to and at the battle of Bear River, the morning report shows seventy sick in quarters and twenty-two in hospital; one officers and six men have died of their wounds, all being shot in a vital part; four men have had their toes amputated and two have lost a finger each.

The inmates of the hospital are now doing well, and with one exception will all probably recover.

There are four cavalry stables, two Quartermaster's stables, and one blacksmith shop, all of which are constructed of willows bound together by uprights, and well lined, and covered with straw and earth. The stables are very warm, well drained, and convenient to good water.

The buildings combine comfort with economy, and materials used in their construction will answer every purpose in the erection of more permanent quarters. The Post Treasurer's books are well and neatly kept. The fund is divided among the companies at the post.

The capacity of the officers conducting the administrative and staff departments good. Their books and papers are in good order, and their respective duties discharged with fidelity and economy to the Government and credit to themselves. There is $403.25 in United States Treasury notes on hand in Quartermaster's Department. The condition of all the public property, with the exception of a few wagons (which need repair), is good, having been well taken care of and carefully used. There is no post school, but several moral and religious societies exercise a healthful influence in the command. Divine service is well attended.

There are but two desertions to record during the last two months. Courts-martial are rare, have been seldom for grave offenses, and very few offenders requiring punishment. The officers of the post are, with two exceptions, gentlemen of sound health, good moral character, and temperate habits, and attentive and efficient in the discharge of their duties.

Enclosed herewith I have the honor to transmit rolls of officers and men who have been mustered into the service since the organization of the companies and regiments.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. EDW. CONNOR,
Colonel, Third Infantry, California Volunteers, Inspecting Officer.

To Lieut.-Col. R.C. Drum, Assistant Adjutant-General, U.S. Army, Department of Pacific, San Francisco.




The Battle of Bear River

Report of an expedition against the Snake and Shoshone Indians on Bear River, in northern Utah and southern Idaho, during the month of January, 1863, by the special correspondent of the "Daily Alta California" newspaper.

This report is inserted in this place as part of the history of the Second Cavalry, for the reason that the greater part of the force engaged were from that regiment, though the expedition was commanded by Colonel P. Edward Connor, of the Third California Infantry. Four companies of the Second Cavalry and one company of the Third California Infantry took part in the battle.

The Expedition

The circumstances which gave rise to the expedition against the Indians are numerous and diversified. The conception of the expedition is due to Colonel P. Edward Connor, and the brilliant execution of his plans and their glorious results are exclusively the well-earned honors of his brave officers and his no less brave men. Judge J/f. Kinney issued a write for the apprehension of Indian chiefs Sand Pitch, Sag Witch, and Bear Hunter, on the charge of murdering miners passing to and from this city and the new gold mines in Washington and Dakota Territories. Colonel Connor - from the first reports of the murder of immigrants on the Humboldt and various other localities along the norther route to California last summer - determined in cutting off the savages, and commenced the carrying out of his design by the cavalry expedition from Ruby Valley last fall, in which Major McGarry was so very successful in the accomplishments of his commander's instructions, save and except in his inability to find trees on which to hang the murderous savages. Since that time the Indian attacks upon the whites, traveling to and from the Dakota Mines, have only added determination to determination to rid the country of this terrible scourge - this perpetual reign of terror; and wherever there was the slightest hope of reaching the savages the gallant Major was ordered in pursuit. Twice, since the arrival of the Volunteers at Salt Lake, expeditions have been sent into the northern settlements of this Territory - the first for the recovery of a white boy retained by the Indians, and the second for the recovery of immigrant property. From reliable information recently furnished Colonel Connor of the locality of the Indians who had been engaged in the murderous work for the last fifteen years, the expedition was undertake, the more recent attacks and murders only adding to the incentive to "make clean work of the savages." Preparations for the expedition were in progress when Marshal Gibbs called upon the Colonel for a military escort to protect him in serving the writs for the Indian chiefs named. The Colonel acknowledged no authority for calling on a military escort till a civil posse had been called, tried, and failed; but at the same time informed the Marshal that he was prepared to start for that place, and would inform him of his intended departure the night preceding the time fixed, that he might accompany the expedition; but he could promise no prisoners - it was not his intention to have any. This much, as a prelude, is not without its interest, as it will have its bearing on record, and will award to the sword instead of the ermine the initiation of a struggle that will eventuate in "freeing the country of its foes."

On Thursday, January twenty-second, Captain Samuel N. Hoyt, with forty men of Company K, Third Infantry, accompanied by a train of fifteen wagons, taking with them two howitzers, left Camp Douglas, with secret instructions, secrets as far as his duties, etc., were concerned, but public enough for the "Indian runners" to know that the camp on Bear River was the destination of the troops. Through the snow the infantry plodded along, till beyond the confines of the city on the west, where the train received its Volunteers. Taking into account the recent snows, the northerly climate, and the road that would have to be made over the summit of the mountains, separating Cache and Box Elder Valleys, the infantry were to pursue their march leisurely, with the view also that the Indians might learn the strength of the Volunteers, and basing calculations thereon, would gather in their stronghold and have a battle. The ruse was successful. Two Indian boys, one of them in the service of the mountaineer, reached the Indian camp with the intelligence of the march, numbers, etc. The Indian chiefs were unconcerned, but gave orders for their warriors to prepare, while they visited, as usual, the settlements. On the morning of the sixth day's march, as Captain Hoyt and his men entered the town of Franklin, Bear Hunter left it. The same evening, after a four days' ride, one of sixty miles and the others of easier marches, over the mountains, in deep snow and with a piercing, cold, bitter wind that nearly disabled a third of the command, Major McGarry, with two hundred cavalry, accompanied by Colonel Connor and his aids, at midnight rode into the settlement and fraternized with the infantry. The Indians could know nothing of the approach of any cavalry, and thus far the plan for their destruction had been successfully concealed. The infantry had orders to march at the first hours of the morning, and the cavalry to rest for a few hours. The unbroken roads impeded the progress of the infantry, and the heavy howitzers were clearly to fall in the rear; yet concealment being success, the cavalry dashed on at its appointed hour, and reached the banks of Bear River before the dawn of day had fully illuminated the field of contest.

The orders to "load" and "forward" soon succeeded each other, and Major McGarry, accompanied by Major Gallagher, led the way into the river with Company K, Second Cavalry, Lieutenant Darwin Chase and fifty men; Company M, Second Cavalry, Captain Geo. F. Price and fifty men; Company H. Second Cavalry, Captain Daniel McLean and fifty men; and Company A. Second Cavalry, Lieutenant Quinn and fifty men. The passage of the river was extremely difficult, from the hard ice at ice bottom, underlying the current that carried also broken sheets of ice with it, to the incessant noise and danger of upsetting the horses and their riders. The companies of Price and Chase, first reaching the northern bank of the river, had orders to advance, and after a short gallop they halted at the foot of the mountains to form in line of battle. The companies of McLean and Quinn were soon up in the rear, but before the men had all dismounted the Indians had saluted them with a shower of lead, wounding one of the Volunteers.

Colonel Connor had remained on the south bank of the river, giving instructions for the passage of the infantry and the howitzers when they should get up, and had instructed Major McGarry to surround the ravine in which the Indians had camped, and had no expectation of opening the fight until the infantry had arrived; but the Indians precipitated the engagement, and the Major, unable to flank them with the first two companies at his disposal, ordered them to advance as skirmishers. The Colonel was over the river and up at the fight in a few minutes after, and the other companies advanced in the same order.

The winter quarters of this band was probably first selected for protection from the blasts of winter, as the ravine was over twenty feet deep and open only to the south; and as, probably, soon after its occupancy they saw the advantages of the defenses it afforded in case of attack, and, as found by the troops, the Indians had exhibited excellent engineering in its defense. At that place Bear River flows almost directly due west, though its general course is southwest. The ravine occupied by the Indians was almost due north and south, though embellished with curves enough east and west and west and east.

The banks of the ravine are almost perpendicular, and only accessible by a few artificial, intricate windings, except at the mouth of the ravine, near the river, where it widens and loses its depth. The troops, to approach the ravine, had to pass over two "benches," or slight declivities, which necessarily exposed them to the fire of the Indians before they could have time to see the position of the latter. Anticipating the attack from the east - as, in fact, it was the only position for attack - the Indians had used freely the pick and shovel and cut artificial benches on that side of the ravine, so that they could rise at will to see their enemy, fire away, and descend again out of danger. Their lodges were also well protected at the bottom by rocks and earth, and being planted in positions conveniently surrounded by thick willows, they may be said to have had a miniature Sebastopol. The Volunteers now say that with the same number of troops as Indians in such a position, they could have held at bay two thousand soldiers. The sides of the ravine perpendicular, protected by benches east and west; the north end of it lost in the mountain, and the south end bordering on the river, they undoubtedly fancied themselves in perfect security. As confirmation of this was the fact that they had all their ponies tied up together, and the squaws and papooses were about the lodges as usual.

As the dismounted cavalry advanced towards the ravine, the Indians who had been on the benches bordering upon it tantalizing our troops to advance, immediately retreated, and, as the Volunteers approached, sent out their deadly fire, which sent down the men "like the leaves of autumn." The completely concealed and protected Indians had then before them the fight as they wanted it, but the Colonel immediately ordered the men to cover themselves as well as they could and save their ammunition, while he ordered Major McGarry and a detachment of men to climb the mountain to the north, outflank them, and take them in the rear from the west side. Skirmishing as they went northward, the detachment the Indians on the left, while the other cavalry engaged them in front. By this time the infantry under Captain Hoyt had arrived. Hearing the firing while yet at a distance, the infantry hastened up the river, and in the eagerness for a share of the fight attempted to ford the river on foot, by t finding it impossible with safety to themselves and to their arms, fell back. The cavalry horses were sent over to them, and dripping wet, on a severe cold morning, our brave Volunteers mounted, crossed the river, and galloped up to the battle. They were immediately ordered to support Major McGarry in his flanking movement, and, with this increased force, the object was accomplished.

Captain Hoyt got to the west side of the ravine, and, while a portion of his men kept up their fire directly in the rear of the Indians, the others were stretched out in a perfect cordon over the north end of the ravine, forming, with the cavalry in front, about three quarters of a circle. By this enfilading from three points the Indians were gradually driven to the center and southward. They exhibited the daring of men who fully comprehended the forlorn position they occupied, made no attempt to run, but fought doggedly, contesting with every man the moment they could behold him. As the battle continued, and the Indian position became clearly untenable, the Colonel ordered a detachment of mounted cavalry to get round the ravine, to the west side, on the borders of the river, with the view of cutting off their retreat, as the complete investment of the ravine rendered that their only hope of escape should they attempt even that. As expected, they ultimately broke and hurried to the mouth of the ravine, where portions of Companies K and M were prepared for them on the east. The Indians fought bravely; but now, away from their lodges and places of natural and artificial defense, it was their turn to feel the weakness of exposure. The Indians there fell in heaps; some attempted to escape into the river, but the keen eye of the Volunteer, avenging the helpless emigrants, the women and children whose blood had been unatoned, and the fresh flowing blood of his comrade lying at his feet, was, in a moment, upon the fleeing form of the savage, and the deadly rifle did its work, and few escaped. Other Indians sought refuge in the thick willows of the ravine, and on the border of the river; but the order to "scour the brushes" dislodged the sneaking foe. Some of them counting, no doubt, on the fate that surely awaited them, revealed the places of their concealment by the deadly fire they kept up from the willows, and one by one they were dislodged, and the silence of grim death began to reign, where before the hills had reverberated with the incessant crack of the rifle. The last of the enemy waited his chance, and, while Major Gallagher was leading on a detachment into the brushes, let blaze at the Major, and sent his through his left arm into his side. Loading again, before they could see his place of concealment, the Indian fired again, and knocked a Volunteer from his horse, who was close by the side of the Colonel. A volley from the detachment in the direction of the blaze that revealed the Indian's concealment ended the bloody struggle.

As soon as the battle was over the wounded were carried to the Surgeon's tent, and had his first, best, and unremitting attention. The dead were gathered up and placed in the baggage wagons, then the lodges of the Indians and their property were destroyed. There were sixty-eight lodges in all, and provisions enough to serve the whole band for a number of months. The lodges were burned, and what could not be used by the troops, or made salable for the Government, was destroyed, save enough to subsist upward of one hundred and twenty squaws and papooses who had survived the raging storm of battle. On the south side of the river-bank the Volunteers encamped for the night, to enjoy refreshment and rest, and to fight their battles o'er again as they grouped in peace together round their bivouac fires. Next morning the wounded had the attention of the Colonel and Dr. Reid, and every means of transportation was engaged to rush them on to quarters. The Doctor started with them in sleighs over the deep snow, till within twenty miles of camp he found other conveyances, and arrived with his wounded charge between the night of Monday and Tuesday following. The weather, fortunately, had greatly moderated, and though still cold, the wounded were very comfortably provided for, and suffered nothing from exposure. Not a murmur was even heard of their long journey, and every man seemed to be more solicitous for his comrade than himself, and every act of kindness and attention that the lesser wounded could show to those less fortunate, was done with a readiness and cheerfulness that showed there was more of country than of men in the relationship between them. They were brothers in arms for a common cause.

Colonel Connor dispatched to Colonel Evans to make very preparation for the reception of the wounded, and gave the necessary instructions for the disposal of the dead. Dr. Reid sent in advance of his train of wounded, messengers every day, to make preparations in the settlement for their arrival; and Colonel Evans had rations served, and tea, coffee, and soups cooks, awaiting them, or being carried to the hospital, the theater, and the chapel tent, which had been fitted up with everything that would conduce to the convenience and comfort of the wounded. The stillness of the midnight hour when they arrived, and the flag drooping at half-mast, lent a solemnity to the scene not soon to be eradicated from our memories. There was a sadness about the camp that was felt by every person, and only rendered supportable by the knowledge of the bravery of our men, the complete success of the expedition, and the extermination of the murderous savages.

The Arrival of the Command.


Detained by the snows in the mountains, the command only returned on the evening of the fourth, cold and weary. A drove of about a hundred head of Indian horses entering the camp was the first announcement of the returning of the men. Then rode up the Colonel in a "buggy," with the renowned Porter Rockwell, of great Mormon notoriety, who had been his guide, and soon after appear Major McGarry at the head of the cavalry, the infantry following, mounted on the Indian ponies they had captured. The command was soon in quarters, and the sick and crippled received the attention which their condition demanded. In the assistance of Dr. Reid, the names of Dr. Williamson, of the command, and Dr. Walcott Steel, of Dayton, Nevada, deserve mention. Both gentlemen went out about fifty miles to meet the wounded, and have since been close in their attentions to them.

That the Indians in Idaho Territory, and to the north of us, have been effectually checked in their murdering career, is with some a matter exceedingly doubtful. Those who know them best, and on whose judgment I would place confidence, think that the Indians will never again attempt a fair, stand-up fight. Possibly, after the winter has broken up, another expedition will be set out after Po-ca-tello, and other chiefs, who have large bands with them. I am inclined to the belief that Colonel Connor will clear the northern route to California of Indians this coming summer. If he is not ordered East he will doubtless attempt to conciliate his men to their disappointment by engaging them in active service on the northern and central routes. There need be no apprehension of these routes henceforth being left to the mercy of the savages, for whether the present Volunteers remain or not, a military force will be maintained.

Captain McLean was yesterday very low, but is something better, and it is hoped that he will rally yet. Lieutenant Berry is also much better. Major Gallagher is clearly processing favorably. The wounded officers and men have every medical attention and good nursing.

Dr. Reid has earned for himself imperishable honors for his labors, night and day, among the wounded. Colonel Connor and the officers of the command are unceasing in their attentions, and a kindly feeling is everywhere manifest.

It is much easier to conceive than to execute, and it is a much simpler business to ask than to grant. To have sent you an imperfect list of the wounded, would have been only to add pain to anxiety. Not a friend, relative, or family interested in the California Volunteers would have been satisfied with learning that "he was wounded." It is the natural inquiry, "How much?" "Slightly?" "Dangerously?" "Mortally?" and "Where?" I conceived, therefore, that a full report alone would satisfy the citizens of California, and here it is, though I have necessarily had to wait for it. I telegraphed to, wrote to, and visited the camp to obtain it, but delay was unavoidable. Colonel Connor freely favored my request, and Dr. Reid - to whom your correspondent is indebted for many courtesies - at once set about the work.

The list is painfully interesting. The character of the wounds show, more forcibly than could our feeble pen exhibit, the terrible contest that must have raged the first few hours of the day on the Memorable twenty-ninth of January. Nothing but the daring, heroic, indomitable will of the Volunteers could have stood up against the well directed fire of the Indians. Protected in his lurking place, where no eye could behold his presence, he steadily aimed and sent the messenger of death with almost murderous precision at every touch of the trigger. The more serviceable also appears this carefully prepared list, as the sad fact is too visible, that since the battle more than one half the number that there fell have died from their wounds. How many more may be added to this list is beyond the ken of mortals; but if hope can be nourished, and groundless fears be dispelled by certified facts, the list will not have been published in vain:

Second Cavalry - Company A.
Killed - J.A. Baldwin, private, through the check. G. German, private, above the heart.
Wounded - John Welch, private, arrow in each lung; dangerously. William Wall, private, shot in right arm; dangerously. W.H. Lake, private, shot in the mouth; badly. William Jay, private, index finger shot off; slightly. James Montgomery, private, right lung, dangerously.

Company H.
Killed. - C. Hallowell, private, center of chest. J.K. Briggs, private, through the chest.
Wounded - B. C. Hutchingson, private, right arm, badly. F. Farley, private, right side; badly. H. Connor, private, left eye; dangerously. J. Logue, right elbow; badly. M. O'Brien, private, left lung, dangerously. P. Frawley, private, right shoulder and spine; dangerously. P. Shaub, private, left lung; dangerously. J. Cloves, private, right shoulder; slightly. J. Franklyn, private, right hip and neck dangerously. James Cantillon, Sergeant, left lung; dangerously. T. Ridge, private, right arm; slightly.

Company K.
Killed. - Christian Smith, Bugler, center of chest, right to left. Shelbourne Reed, private, through the head. Adolphus Rowe, private, through both lungs. Lewis Anderson, private, through the heart. Henry W. Trempf, private, through both lungs.
Wounded: M. Elleg, private, right shoulder; badly. A. McCoy, private, navel; slightly. Benjamin Landes, corporal, right shoulder; dangerously. Robert Hargrave, private, right elbow; badly. S.C. Bush, private, left ankle; badly. W.B. Welton, private, right thigh; badly. W.M. Slocum, private, right lung; dangerously. John Lee, private, right arm and hip, badly. A.M. Parker, private, left arm; badly. --Brady, nose and face; dangerously. N. Kinsley, private, right side and arm; dangerously. J.S. Langley, private, neck; badly. John Daley, left breast and shoulder; dangerously. -- Kelly, abdomen; slightly.

Company M.
Killed. - G.C. Cox, private, through both lungs. G.W. Hoten, through the heart. A.F. Howard, Wagoner, through the heart.
Wounded. - A. Stevens, Sergeant, chest and shoulder; dangerously. P. Humbert, private, top of head; slightly. -- Heffner, private, right arm; slightly. John Stevens, private, top of head; slightly. J. Leggitt, private, left shoulder, dangerously. T. Barcafer, private, right shoulder; dangerously. R. Miller, private, right shoulder; dangerously. E.C. Chase, private, right shoulder; badly. M. Forbes, private, hand and arm; badly. L.W. Hughes, Corporal, nose and right side, badly. L.D. Hughes, private, right lef; badly. W.M. Davis, private, right lung; died at Ogden, February 2, 1863. W.H. Hood, private, left hand and groin; badly. L. Robins, Sergeant, right side; badly.

Third Infantry - Company K.
Killed. - John E. Baker, private, through heart and stomach. S.J.W. Thomas, private, through the chest.
Wounded - A. Austin, Sergeant, right eye, dangerously. E.C. Hoyt, Sergeant, left lung; dangerously. J. Hensley, private, right leg; badly. T.B. Walker, private, left side; badly.

Officers Wounded.
Major P.A. Gallagher, Third Infantry, left arm; badly. Captain Daniel McLean, Company H, Second Cavalry, left thigh and right arm; dangerously. Lieutenant Darwin Chase, Company K, Second Cavalry, left lung; dangerously. Lieutenant D.J. Berry, Company A. Second Cavalry, right shoulder; dangerously.

The following named officers and men are in hospital with frosted feet:

Second Cavalry

Company A. - Corporals Spreggle and Duvall; privates G.R. Swan, John D. Marker, S. Shomadan, R.M. McNulty, and --McCue.

Company H. - Sergeant J.W. Kilgore; privates George Fisher, Stultz, A. Langraf, John Allman, Bradley, T.R. Gaston, A.G. Lockhard, H. Smith, J.M. Norton, W.M. Stier, W.M. Maher, W.W. Goodell, W.M. Walton, E.J. Casnean, and H.A. McDonald.

Company K. - Sergeant W.M. Beach; Corporals W.M. White and Hunt; privates J. Lincoln, Burns, Daley, S. Ausley, M. Atmore, F.W. Becker, W. Chapman, J.J. Hertle, S.L. Caldwell, C. Howe, J. Hill, G. Johnson, A. Mitchell, J. McKnow, A.S. Palmer, C. Wilson and Barton.

Company M. - Sergeant John Cullen; Corporals A.P. Hewett and W.M. Steel; privates W.M. Collins, A.P. Chase, J. Dyer, John McGonagal, and D. Griffin.

Third Infantry

Company K. Sergeants C.J. Herron and C.F. Williams; Corporals J.H. Zollman, J. Wingate, and W.A. Bennett; privates W. St. John, A. Ramsdell, J.E. Epperson, A.F. H. Randall, W.H. Farnham, J. Boarland, G.W. Ticknor, A. Rensho, B.B. Bigelow, J. Anderson, S. Urquhart, F.L. Borass, F.W. Branch, Bailey, Wm. Carlton, D. Donahue, C. H. Godbold, J. Haywood, C.W. Heath, J. Manning. W.G. Way, and J. German.

Recapitulation

Regiment

Killed

Wounded

Frosted Feet

Total

Second Cavalry, Company A

2

5

7

14

Second Cavalry, Company H

2

11

16

29

Second Cavalry, Company K

5

14

21

40

Second Cavalry, Company M

3

15

8

26

Third Infantry, Company K

2

4

27

33

Totals

14

49

79

142

Died - Second Cavalry.
Lieutenant Darwin Chase, Company K, February fourth, at Farmington, U.T.
Private William Davis, Company M, February second, at Ogden, U.T.
Sergeant James Cantillon, Company H, February fifth, at Camp Douglas, U.T.
Private William Slocum, Company K, February fifth, at Camp Douglas, U.T.
Sergeant A. Stevens, Company M, February sixth, at Camp Douglas, U.T.
Private M. O'Brien, Company H, February sixth, at Camp Douglas, U.T.
Corporal P. Frawley, Company H, February eighth, at Camp Douglas, U.T.
Private W. Wall, Company A, February eighth, at Camp Douglas, U.T.

The Burial of the Dead.

However well we may draw upon philosophy and challenge manhood within us, there is, in spite of everything, a cold sadness in the performance of the last homage of the living to the dead. I was at camp from early morn on Friday till late in the evening, in the interment of the Volunteers. The day was cold and raw; notwithstanding, there was a large number of persons from the city. There was probably a score of carriages, many equestrians, and quite a concourse of people on foot. Had it been generally know, there would no doubt of it, have been many more. As it was, I expect it was pleasing to those who take interest in the entente cordiale to witness the very respectful demeanor of those present.

Up to 1 P.m. the sixteen coffins lay side by side in the Quartermaster's storeroom, there the dead were visited by the surviving comrades. At that hour the entire command formed in procession and escorted the bodies to the military graveyard, where Parson Anderson officiated in the burial service. Three volleys were fired over the bodies and they were laid in their graves, and the last solemn rites were ended. The band, that before led the measured, solemn steps of the procession to the funeral dirge and dead march, now moved away gaily, reviving the thoughtful, and recalling to the duties and obligations of life those who had not yet finished their page of history.

On Friday the remains of Lieutenant Chase were consigned to their resting place by the brethren of the Masonic fraternity attached to the command, together with a few from the city. The deceased was a Royal Arch Mason, but the small number of that trade in attendance rendered the adoption of the Master Mason's burial service necessary. For the solicitation of the brethren, Sir Knight Frank Fuller, Secretary of the Territory, officiated as W.M., and Colonel Evans, of the Second Cavalry, as Marshal. Chief Justice Kinney and United States Marshal Gibbs walked in the procession, which consisted together of some twenty members. The services at the grave were of a highly impressive character and were witnessed by nearly the whole command, together with numerous citizens. At the close of the solemnities, the fraternity changed their position, while a dirge was performed by the band, and gave place to a detail of forty-eight soldiers, who fired three volleys over the grave. The procession then returned to camp in reversed order.

Headquarters, District of Utah
Camp Douglas, U.T., February 6, 1863.


"The Colonel commanding has the pleasure of congratulating the troops of this post upon the brilliant victory achieved at the battle of Bear River, Idaho Territory.

"After a rapid march of four nights in tensely cold weather, through deep snow and drifts, which you endured without murmur or complaint, even when some of your numbers were frozen with cold, and faint with hunger and fatigue, you met an enemy who have heretofore, on two occasions, defied and defeated regular troops, and who have for the last fifteen years been the terror of the emigrants - men, women, and children - and citizens of those valleys, murdering and robbing them without fear of punishment.

"At daylight, on the twenty-ninth of January, 1863, you encountered the enemy, greatly your superior in numbers, and had a desperate battle. Continuing with unflinching courage for over four hours you completely cut him to pieces, captured his property and arms, destroyed his stronghold, and burned his lodges.

"The long list of the killed and wounded is the most fitting eulogy on your courage and bravery. The Colonel commanding returns you his thanks. The gallant officers and men who were engaged in this battle, without invidious distinction, merit the highest praise. Your uncomplaining endurance and unexampled conduct on the field, as well as your thoughtful care and kindness for the wounded, is worthy of emulation. While we rejoice at the brilliant victory you have achieved over your savage foe, it is meet that we do honor to the memory to the memory of our brave comrades, the heroic men who feel, fighting to maintain the supremacy of our arms. We deeply mourn their death, and acknowledge their valor.

"While the people of California will regret their loss, they will do honor to every officer and soldier who has by his heroism added new laurels to the fair escutcheon of the State.

"By order of Colonel Connor.


"(Signed)

Wm. D, Ustick
"First Lieut. and Adjutant, Third Infantry, C.V., Acting Assistant Adjutant-General."

The Commander's Congratulations to the Troops

Yesterday afternoon, while the Volunteers were out on dress parade, the following order was read by Adjutant Ustick:


What names have been particularly mentioned in the official returns of the expedition to General Wright, the commander of the Pacific Department, has not transpired, but in an address to his troops, who so valiantly fought, and who carry with them from the field so many evidences of the bloody struggle, the commander could not well have made signal mention of particular persons. There is nothing but evidences of bravery everywhere, and one man was a much exposed as the other. Officers and men stood bravely to their task, and as a body deserve the best of the State they represent. In addition to the names I mentioned, it will not be invidious to give the name of Major P.A. Gallagher as an officer who particularly distinguished himself in the battle. He was there without command - as a volunteer aid to the commander - and yet, though unattached to any particular body of Volunteers, he led fearlessly on to their task several detachments who were temporarily assigned to his leadership, and, when relieved from those duties, was seen riding everywhere, up and down, at the command of both Major McGarry and Colonel Connor. I know that both of these veteran officers are much pleased with the services of the young Major on that occasion.

When the fight was over, and several of the officers were together, the Commander acknowledged and complimented him on his gallant services. He now lies in Major McGarry's quarters; but, with proper care and discretion on his part, will probably be able to report for duty in the course of a few weeks. In my last I gave instances of personal coolness and daring; I should have added one other in favor of Major Gallagher. An Indian had been doing considerable harm to the command, and evidently was enjoying his labors free from danger. The Colonel, annoyed by the savage's success, called to the Major to shoot him. In a moment the Major was after him, and shot him down with his revolver, in the face of his red brethren, who had apparently singled out the gallant officer for their fire. As he wheeled his horse, the Major's cap blew off, and he coolly dismounted, picked it up, and remounted. Seeing that Indian crowd preparing for the Major the Colonel shouted to him to take care, and before the Indian triggers were touched the Colonel ordered the men to fire upon them, and saved the Major.

In terminating my letters on the battle of Bear River, and its various and multifarious sequels, it is proper to say that whatever may be thought of it abroad, there is but one sentiment here - it was a desperate fight, and one that reflects the highest credit upon the entire expedition. The Colonel exhibited high qualities of command, and his perfect coolness and bravery are the universal theme of praise. Possibly, some might have been better pleased with less exposure of their command; but I have the best authority for saying it was the call of duty and not indifference. It is a fact worthy of mention that no soldier there ever saw more deadly foes than those that greeted the Volunteers as they approached the Indian ravine. Now that the battle is won, and the testimony of the Volunteers' undisputed bravery is engraved in history, it can injure nothing to admit that so deadly were the first volleys of the Indians, and so little could be done in return with a sneaking, lurking, concealed foe, that had the order been given to "retire," it could scarcely have been done without a demoralizing effect, if not worse. Coolly, therefore, the Colonel sat, almost motionless, on his charger, within easy distance of the Indian rifles, watching the progress of the fight, and giving his orders. He came out untouched, though death was everywhere around him in close proximity; and probably a portion of his safety may be attributed to the Indians mistaking Lieutenant Chase for him. The Lieutenant's horse had more attractive trappings, and may have drawn more attention. The coolness of Major McGarry was conspicuous. In brief, every officer behaved gallantly, and every man fought well. Peace to the ashes of the fallen, and honors for the living, is the sincere wish of VERITE


Remarks on return of Company D, Second Cavalry, for April, 1863. -

Left Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal., for Owens River and Valley, April 12, 1863. Arrived at Keysville, on Kern River, April 18, 1863. Herd that a large party of Indians were encamped a few miles above, and at 2 o'clock in the morning of the next day surrounded their camp, and killed thirty-five of them; not a soldier injured. Moved on for Camp Independence, where we arrived on Friday, April twenty-fourth. Distance traveled, from two hundred and fifty to two hundred and seventy-five miles. Went on an Indian scout on Saturday, and followed them for two days, but without success.

Remarks on Return of Company E, Second Cavalry, for April, 1863.-

Company arrived at Camp Independence, Owens River Valley, April 4, 1863. Company left Camp Independence, April 9, 1863, and attacked a large body of Indians near Big Pine Creek, supported by Company G, same regiment. One man of Company E slightly wounded.

Remarks on Return of Company G, Second Cavalry, for April, 1863.-

Thirty miles north of the post, found a large body of Indians, strongly posted in the mountains. Skirmished all the afternoon, and drove them from their position back into the Sierra Nevada, killing and wounding several. Private Thomas Spratt was dangerously shot in the head. Command absent from the post eleven days.

Remarks on Return of Company M, Second Cavalry, for April, 1863.-

The company has traveled four hundred and twenty-five miles in the saddle during the past month. Had three engagements with Indians during the month, winning each fight. Left Camp Douglas on the twentieth instant, and arrived at the post on the twenty-sixth instant. During the year just ended, in which this company has performed duty in Nevada and Utah Territories, it has traveled over twenty-six hundred miles of a direct march, had four Indian battles (Bear River, U.T., among the number) and made treaty with Winnemucca, chief of the Piute tribe, on Truckee River, near Pyramid Butte.

Remarks on Return of Company D, Second Cavalry, for May, 1863.-

May 3d. - Lieutenant Geo. D. French and twenty men of the company absent after Indians; found a band and attacked them with seven men, killing one and mortally wounding three.

May 14th. - Captain McLaughlin absent until twenty-first instant in search of "Joaquin Jim" and band. Destroyed his camp, the Indians fleeing to the mountains.

May 31st. - Sergeant McLaughlin absent to meet Indian chief, "Capt. George." Returned with him, May 22, 1863. The company, during this month, has performed several severe marches in the mountains, suffering much for want of water and rations. These marches have been performed on foot, it being impossible to use horses, owing to the rough character of the country; but their labors, coupled with that of the other troops in the valley, have been crowned with success, resulting, as they have, in the subjugation of the Indians, and terminating thus speedily a war which promised to be of much longer duration.

Remarks on Return of Company K, Second Cavalry, for May, 1863.-

Between the tenth and twelfth instant some twenty-five or thirty Indians were taken prisoners at Big Pine Creek and sent to Camp Independence, by order of Captain M.A. McLaughlin.

Remarks on Return of Company K, Second Cavalry, for May, 1863.-

On May first, pursuant to orders from Major Gallgher, at Fort Ruby, Nev., Captain S.P. Smith left Fort Ruby with company to march against the Indians committing depredations on the overland mail route. May second, Lieutenant Quinn, with his detachment, joined the company at Shell Creek. May fourth, forty miles south of Shell Creek, had a fight with the Indians, killing twenty-nine. Private John L. Cree was slightly wounded by an arrow in the back. May sixth had another fight with Indians in Cedar Swamp, fifty miles south of Spring Valley Station; killed twenty-three Indians. Arrived at Fort Ruby on May tenth, after traveling a distance of two hundred and fifty miles.

Remarks on Return of Company L, Second Cavalry, for May, 1863.-

A detachment of four men of the company, in command of Orderly Sergeant Henry C. Church, came upon a party of fourteen Indians near headwaters of Owens River. Attacking them they killed four, and the balance, retreating into the rocks, made their escape. The company has been scouting constantly, and has destroyed about three hundred bushels of seed "cached" near Bishop Creek and vicinity. Most of the caches were found by Sergeant Beebe.

Remarks on Return of Company K, Second Cavalry, for June, 1863.-

On the fifteenth of June, pursuant to orders from Colonel Connor, at Camp Douglas, Captain Smith left Deep Creek and traveled to Government Springs with company, a distance of one hundred and ten miles. On the morning of the twentieth surprised a camp of Indians; killed ten. Found an overland horse in their possession.

Remarks on Return of Company M, Second Cavalry, for June, 1863.-

On June 9, 1863, Captain Price, Lieutenant Conrad, and sixty men of Company M, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, left this post by order of commanding officer at Fort Bridger, on an Indian scout two hundred miles north, to headwaters of Snake River. Returned to this post on twenty-first, having traveled over four hundred miles. Captured forty-nine Shoshone Indians without loss or accident to the troops. Brought the Indians to this post.

Remarks on Return of Company D, Second Cavalry, for July, 1863.-

Pursuant to instructions received from Headquarters Department of the pacific, a detachment of seventy men, composed of Companies D,E, and G, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, and twenty-two men belonging to the Fourth Infantry, California Volunteers, left this camp (Independence), July 11, 1863, with the Indians captured near this place, numbering about one thousand (all under the command of Captain McLaughlin), for San Sebastian Reservation, near Fort Tejon, Cal.

Remarks on Return of Company F, Second Cavalry, for August, 1863.-

Left Camp Union, Cal., July 28, 1863, per Special Order of General commanding Department of the Pacific, and arrived at Camp Bidwell, Butte County, Cal., July 31, 1863, to remain there till further orders, in the meantime affording protection to the whites, and collecting the friendly Indians together in this section and protecting them.

Remarks on Return of Company F, Second Cavalry, for September, 1863.-

In compliance with Post Orders Nos. 6 and 7, left Camp Bidwell, Butte County, California, September 4, 1863, having under my command twenty-three men and horses of Company F, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, and four hundred and sixty-one Indians, to remove them to Indian reservation at Round Valley, Mendocino County, California, arriving there September 18, 1863, with two hundred and seventy-seven Indians. Left one hundred and fifty on east side of the mountains, they being unable to travel. Thirty-two died en route and two escaped. Left Fort Wright, round Valley, September 21, 1863, and arrived at Camp Bidwell, Butte County, California, September 24, 1863.

Remarks on Return of Company F, Second Cavalry, for November, 1863.-

In obedience to Special Order from General commanding Department, left Camp Bidwell, Cal., November nineteenth, with sixteen men of Company F, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, to assist Special Agent to recapture runaway Indians from Round Valley Reservation. Passed through Pentz, Yankee Hill, Cherokee, Hubbards, Oregon City, Oroville, and Henshaw's Ranch (all in Butte County). Returned to Camp Bidwell on the twenty-third of November, capturing twenty Indians en route, having marched over a distance of one hundred and thirty miles. Left Camp Bidwell November twenty-fifth, en route to Indian Reservation, Round Valley, with Indians captured (going by way of Tehama). Arrived there on the twenty-eighty, turning over Indians to the Supervisor.

Extract from a letter of Major Henry D. Wallen, Seventh U.S. Infantry, commanding Fort Sumner, New Mexico, to General Carleton, commanding Department of New Mexico.

Headquarters Fort Sumner, New Mexico,
December 18, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to report, that about 4 o'clock on the morning of the sixteenth instant, Mr. Lababie, Indian Agent, and the Rev. Mr. Fialon, Chaplain of the post, reported to me that a large number of Navajo Indians, with an immense herd of sheep, were at the Carretas. I immediately had the officers of Company D, Fifth Infantry, and Company C, Seventh Infantry, awakened and their companies prepared to take the field, with two days' rations in haversacks. Lieutenant Latimer, with eight mounted men of Company B, Second California Cavalry (all the cavalry at the post), were also got in readiness. Mr. Labadie, Mr. Fialon, and about thirty Apache Indians also started in pursuit. The companies left the post at 5:30 a.m., for the Carretas. The mounted party, and the Indian Agent with his Indians, outstripped the party on foot, having taken up the Navajo trail on the west bank of the Pecos River, and about ten miles from the post. At a distance of thirty-five miles in a direct line, a little north of west from Fort Sumner, they overtook the Navajoes, in number about one hundred and thirty, ten mounted, and twenty armed with rifles. They had five thousand two hundred and fifty-nine sheep. A severe contest ensued, in which the Navajoes lost twelve killed and left on the field, and a number killed and wounded who were carried off; one prisoner taken. All the sheep recover, and thirteen burros, four rifles, one horse, all their provisions, blankets, moccasins (one hundred and fifty pairs), and pretty much all the effects which they had taken from Mr. Labadie's train, en route to this place.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,


H.D. Wallen,
Major Seventh Infantry, U.S.A., Commanding.


Remarks on Return of Company F, Second Cavalry, for July, 1864. -

In obedience to instructions from General commanding District of California, Captain Augustus W. Starr, commanding Company F, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, left Camp Union, Cal., at 7 o'clock A.M, July 21, 1864, with ten men of Company F and Corporal Church of Company D, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, and one six-mule team, en route to Snellings, Merced County, Cal. Arrived there at 4 o'clock P.M., July twenty-fourth, and arrested William Hall, editor of the Merced "Democrat." Returning, arrived at Stockton at 2:30 o'clock P.M., July twenty-fifth. At 4 o'clock P.M. left for San Francisco, per steamer, with the prisoner and Corporal Reynolds as guard, leaving the remainder of the men to proceed overland to Camp Union. Arrived at San Francisco, Cal., at 3 o'clock P.M., July twenty-sixth, and delivered the prisoner to commanding officer at Fort Alcatraz.

Remarks on Return of Company M, Second Cavalry, for August, 1864.-

Troops returned from Salt Lake and Fort Mojave wagon road expedition, August 30, 1864, having traveled: principal route (as measured by odometer), one thousand three hundred and fourteen miles; secondary routes, eight hundred and twenty-nine miles; observation lines, five hundred and fifty-five miles; total, two thousand seven hundred and ninety-eight miles. Time occupied, one hundred and fourteen days. Country examined: that portion of Utah, California and Arizona lying between 35 degrees and 41 degrees north latitude and 112 degrees and 114 degrees west longitude from Greenwich. Report of expedition and map of routes not yet filed. George F. Price, Captain Second Cavalry, commanding expedition, and George D. Conrad, First Lieutenant Second cavalry, on duty with expedition.

Remarks on Return of Company F, Second Cavalry, for April, 1865.-

On the twenty-fourth of April, started for Colusa and arrived there on April twenty-sixth. On the trip arrested a prominent traitor of Yolo County, and took him into camp and confined him with other prisoners destined to be delivered to the authorities at Camp Union, Cal.

Remarks on Muster Roll of Company D, Second Cavalry, for May and June, 1865. -

Left fort Bridger, Wy. T., May 17, 1865, en route eastward. Arrived at Fort Laramie, Wy.T., via the Cheyenne Pass route, June 5, 1865. Distance, four hundred and fifty-seven miles. The squadron has been constantly on the scout since its arrival here. A detachment of forty-eight men from the squadron, under command of Colonel Moonlight, Eleventh Kansan Cavalry Volunteers, left this post June fourteenth, on an Indian raid. The third day out, the Colonel gave orders to turn the horses out to graze. There being no picket guard out, the Indians stampeded twenty-seven of the horses. Having no means of getting the saddles, bridles, and horse equipments back to this post, the Colonel ordered them to be burned. Two privates wounded, and six Indians killed.

Remarks on Return of Company B, Second Cavalry, for August, 1865.-

The company left Gravelly Ford, Humboldt County, Nev., on the second day of August, 1865, on a scout for Indians. Trailed across the mountains twenty-five miles; came to the river and found a camp the Indians had left. Followed their trail, killed one, and captured a number of squaws. Returned to camp, scouting down the river; found a camp of hostile Indians. Killed two and wounded several more; and, in compliance with instructions from headquarters District of Nevada, left Gravelly Ford on the twelfth day of August, 1865, for Dun Glen, and arrived there August 21, 1865. Distance, one hundred and twenty-five miles.

Remarks on Return of Company I, Second Cavalry, for August, 1865.-

Lieutenant Tagge, with twenty-three men, returned from detached service on the fifth instant, from escort duty. Sergeant Stevens and twelve men had an engagement with the Indians in Paradise Valley, Nevada, on July twenty-sixth. Private Herford was killed, and privates Joshua C. Murphy and Thomas J. Riehl were wounded. They were reinforced by a Sergeant and ten men from the First Cavalry, Nevada Volunteers, routing the Indians, and killing twnenty-one of them. On the twenty-second Sergeant Stevens, Corporal Rugg, and twenty-one privates joined the company at Camp McDermit, Nev.

Remarks on Return of Company M, Second Cavalry, for August, 1865.-

The company left Camp No. 3, Little cottonwood Creek, D.T., on the morning of the first instant. Struck the Platte River and marched up the river to the platte bridge; thence in a northwesterly course until reaching the Big Horn Mountains. Crossed over this range and made a scout through Big Horn Valley; thence across the mountains to the east side, taking the north fork of Crazy Woman Creek, a southerly course until striking Powder River, and down it to Fort Connor. The squadron joined Colonel Connor's column on Clear Fork. On the twenty-ninth, under command of Colonel Connor, came upon the village of Arapahoes, on Tongue River; killed sixty-three Indians, captured six hundred head of horses and mules, and burned their lodges and winter supplies. Thence came down Tongue River to camp.

Remarks on Return of Company B, Second Cavalry, for September, 1865.-

In accordance with Paragraph 5, S.O. No. 4,Headquarters District of Nevada, and in compliance with Paragraph 2, Orders No. 2, Headquarters Dun Glen, Nevada, dated August 30, 1865, a detachment of twenty enlisted men of Company B, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, under command of Second Lieutenant H.C. Penwell, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, was ordered to report at Unionville to a citizen named Stafford, who, affording three Indian guides, went to a rancheria of hostile Indians, about thirty-five from last place, and found, at daybreak, the Indians, seven in number, and three squaws in the rancheria. Killed all the Indians and accidentally killed the squaws; also destroyed a large quantity of ammunition and supplies. Finding no more hostile Indians in that vicinity, the detachment returned to Dun Glen. Entire distance marched, one hundred and fifty miles.

Remarks on Return of Company B, Second Cavalry, for November, 1865. -

In accordance with P.O. No. 35, dated November 12, 1865, First Lieutenant R.A. Osmer, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, and sixty enlisted men of Company B, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, proceeded to the Black Rock Mountains on November 13, 1865, taking with them one mountain howitzer. At Willow Creek Station, thirty-five miles from this post (Dun Glen, Nev.) seven enlisted men, who were on detached service, joined company; also two citizens, and ten Indian warriors under command of Captain "Sou" (friendly Piute). On Friday, at daybreak, attacked the Indian camp five miles from Black Rock Mountains, and one hundred and five miles northwest of this post. Killed about one hundred and twenty Indians in all; of these about eighty were bucks, but the Indian allies could not be restrained from a general slaughter, neither could a squaw be distinguished from a buck in the general fight, and but one Indian is supposed to have escaped. Captured a quantity of ammunition, several guns, five Indian ponies, and destroyed a large lot of provisions. These were the same Indians who killed and robbed the teamster two weeks ago, as some of his load was found in camp. The loss was private David W. O'Connell, killed, and Sergeant Lansdon and private Moon, wounded; also one horse wounded, but will recover. Four privates deserted the day of departure from this post. Detachment returned to this post at 6 o'clock A.M, November 20, 1865. Distance traveled, two hundred and fifty miles.

Remarks on Return of Company B, Second Cavalry, for January, 1866.-

Captain George D. Conrad, and thirty-seven enlisted men of Company B, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, left this post (Dun Glen, Nev.) on the eighty instant, to scout the country in the vicinity of Paradise and Queens River Valleys. On the morning of the twelfth instant, discovered and attacked an Indian camp, on Fish Creek, in Queens River Valley, killing thirty-five Indians. Our loss was three men wounded, one horse killed, and seven horses wounded. Command returned to post on the fifteenth instant. Distance marched, two hundred and twenty miles. Captain Conrad, Lieutenant Osmer, and forty-eight enlisted men of Company B, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, left this post on the twenty-fourth instant, and proceeded to scout Humboldt Valley, in the vicinity of Badger Ranch. On the morning of the twenty-sixth instant, discovered fires on the opposite side of the river. The delay in crossing caused by us, and high water, enabled the Indians to escape. Distance marched, ninety miles.

Remarks on Return of Company K, Second Cavalry, for January, 1866.-

According to instructions from Headquarters District of Nevada, and S.O. No. 31, of December 20, 1865, I left Fort Churchill, Nev., December 21, 1865, with nineteen men of company, to execute orders at Dun Glen, Nev. After four days' march, I arrived at Blake's Station, where the citizens turned over to me a notorious Indian called "Black Rock Tom." After being put in charge of the guard, he tried to escape, and was shot dead by some of the command.

Remarks on Return of Company F, Second Cavalry, for February, 1866. -

Left Castle Rock, Nevada, with Major Smith's command on February nineteenth, in pursuit of Indians. Discovered the Indian camp after traveling five days in a northeast course, eighty miles from Fort Bidwell, Cal., at Rock Canon, Guano Valley, Nev. The attack on the Indian camp was made at 9:30 o'clock, A.M. on the morning of the fifteenth, the fight continuing till 3:30 o'clock P.M. As the troops charged on the camp the Indians retreated to Rock Canon and Bluff. The chief, Smoke Creek Jim, was killed at the commencement of the fight. Found on the field, at the close of the fight, eighty-one warriors. Killed fifteen squaws and papooses in the rocks, it being impossible to distinguish one sex from the other. Fifteen Indians, supposed to be badly wounded, hid in caves and escaped the following night. During the action, nineteen squaws and papooses were taken prisoners and placed under guard. On breaking up camp on the morning of the twentieth, they were set at liberty and supplied with thirty days' rations of dried beef. Captured seventy-five horses, belonging to citizens of Superior Valley, Cal. The whole Indian camp and equipage, and about three tons of dried beef, were committed to the flames. The camp was composed of thirty-five wickiups. The band of Indians was composed of Piutes, Bannocks, and Snakes, who had been committing depredations in this section of the country for the past four years.

Remarks on Return of Company D, Second Cavalry, for March, 1866. -

Lieutenant George H. Robinson, with thirty-three enlisted men, returned March 4,1 866, from scout after Indians, having had an engagement on the fifteenth of February, 1866, at or near Rock Canon, Nev., killing a large number of Indians and losing one man.

Headquarters, District of Nevada,
Camp McGarry, Nevada, December 31, 1866.

General Orders
No. 8.

1. The successful operations of the military of this district during the year 1866 deserve to be commended by the commanding officer, as it is believed they will bear favorable comparison with any that have been carried on against hostile Indians in any section of the Union. Several bands have been entirely broken up, and the country has been rendered safe for travelers and settlers. A brief summary will show what these operations have been.
 
2. On the eleventh of January, 1866, Captain George D. Conrad, with thirty-five men of Company B, and twenty-five men of Company I, under Lieutenant Dunca, Second California Cavalry Volunteers, attacked a band of hostile Indians on the west side of Queens River, near Fish Creek. Corporal Bidwell and private Allen of Company I, and privates Thomas A. Duffield, John Riley, and Richard Shultz of Company B, Second California Cavalry, were wounded. Thirty-five Indians were killed and nine taken prisoners. Two horses were killed and nine wounded.

3. On the fifteenth of February, 1866, a detachment under command of Major Samuel P. Smith, Second California Cavalry Volunteers, composed of thirty-two men of Company D, and nineteen men of Company F, same regiment and thirty citizens, fought the Indians near Rock Canon - one hundred and fifteen Indians were killed and nineteen captured. Private Austin of Company D was killed. Major Smith, privates Resler, Grimshaw, Rhuman, and Belta of Company D, privates Mills and Smith of Company F, were wounded. Major Mellon, Captain Starr, and Lieutenant Robinson, Second California Cavalry, accompanied Major Smith. Sixty horses, which had been stolen from the settlers, were recovered, and a large amount of Indian property was destroyed.

4. On the seventh of March, 1866, Sergeant James T. Edwards, with eight men of Company I, Second California Cavalry Volunteers, killed six Indians in Paradise Valley.

5. On the eighteenth of May, 1866, one hundred and twenty Indian prisoners were brought in to Fort Churchill, and delivered to Brevet-Colonel A.G. Brackett, Major First U.S. Cavalry, Commanding Post. They were subsequently turned over to the Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Nevada, in obedience to orders from
Department Headquarters.

(Signed:)
A.G. BRACKETT
Major First Regiment, U.S. Cavalry, Commanding District.

 


The following are the stations of headquarters and the different companies as shown by the monthly returns and muster rolls on the last days of the months.


Field Staff and Band

Camp Alert, Cal............................................................................... September 30, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal......................................................................................October 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal..................................................................................November 30, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal..................................................................................December 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal.......................................................................................January 31, 1862.
Camp Alert, Cal.. ..................................................................................February 28, 1862.
No reports from February 28, 1862, to June 30, 1864.
Camp Conness, I.T......................................................................................June 30, 1864.
Camp Conness, I.T.......................................................................................July 31, 1864.
Camp Conness, I.T..................................................................................August 31, 1864.
Camp Conness, I.T...........................................................................September 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal....................................................................................October 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal................................................................................November 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal... ............................................................................December 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal....................................................................................January 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal..................................................................................February 28, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal......................................................................................March 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal........................................................................................April 30, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal.........................................................................................May 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal.........................................................................................June 30, 1865
Camp Union, Cal.........................................................................................July 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal.....................................................................................August 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal...............................................................................September 30, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal...................................................................................October 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal...............................................................................November 30, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal................................................................................December 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal....................................................................................January 31, 1866.
Camp Union, Cal..................................................................................February 28, 1866.
Camp Union, Cal.....................................................................................March 31, 1866.

Company A

Camp Alert, Cal. .....................................................................................October 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................November 30, 1861.
Fort Churchill, Nev..............................................................................December 31, 1861.
Fort Churchill, Nev..................................................................................January 31, 1862.
Fort Churchill, Nev. ..............................................................................February 28, 1862.
No record from February, 1862, to July 31, 1863.
Camp No. 26, Utah Column, near Fort Ruby, Nev. ....................................July 30, 1863.
Camp Douglas, U.T.......................................................................,,,,,,,,,October 31, 1863.
Camp Douglas, U.T............................................................................November 30, 1863.
Camp Douglas, U.T.............................................................................December 31, 1863.
Camp Douglas, U.T.................................................................................January 31, 1864.
Camp Douglas, U.T...................................................................................March 31, 1864.
Camp Conness, I.T...................................................................................August 31, 1864.
Camp Douglas, U.T............................................................................September 30, 1864.
Camp at Lovelands, U.T.........................................................................October 31, 1864.
Camp at Desert Wells, Nev.................................................................November 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal.................................................................................December 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal.....................................................................................January 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal...................................................................................February 28, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal........................................................................................March 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal..........................................................................................April 30, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal...........................................................................................May 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal...........................................................................................June 30, 1865
Camp Union, Cal............................................................................................July 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal.......................................................................................August 31, 1865.
Fort Miller, Cal....................................................................................September 30, 1865.
Fort Miller, Cal...................................................................................... .October 31, 1865.
Camp Babbitt, Cal................................................................................November 30, 1865.
Camp Babbitt, Cal.................................................................................December 31, 1865.
Camp Babbitt, Cal.................................................................................. February 28, 1866.

Company B

Camp Alert, Cal. .....................................................................................October 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................November 30, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal....................................................................................December 31, 1861.
Camp Drum, Cal.......................................................................................January 31, 1862.
With Colonel Carleton en route to New Mexico....................................February 28, 1862.
No record of the stations of this company from February 28, 1862, to January 31, 1863, but most of the time it was en route to New Mexico.
Fort Sumner, N.M.....................................................................................January 31, 1863.
Fort Sumner, N.M. .................................................................................February 28, 1863.
Fort Sumner, N.M. .....................................................................................March 31, 1863.
Fort Sumner, N.M. .......................................................................................April 30, 1863.
Fort Sumner, N.M..........................................................................................May 31, 1863.
Fort Sumner, N.M. ........................................................................................June 30, 1863.
Fort Sumner, N.M. .........................................................................................July 31, 1863.
Fort Sumner, N.M. ....................................................................................August 31, 1863.
Fort Sumner, N.M. ...............................................................................September 30, 1863.
Fort Sumner, N.M.....................................................................................October 31, 1863.
Fort Sumner, N.M.................................................................................November 30, 1863.
Anton Chico, N.M.................................................................................December 31, 1863.
Fort Sumner, N.M.....................................................................................January 31, 1864.
Fort Sumner, N.M...................................................................................February 29, 1864.
Company en route to Drum Barracks, Cal..................................................March 31, 1864.
Pimo Village, A.T., en route to Drum Barracks, Cal....................................April 30, 1864.
Drum Barracks, Cal........................................................................................May 31, 1864.
Drum Barracks, Cal........................................................................................June 30, 1864.
Cucamonga Ranch, Cal...................................................................................July 31, 1864.
Cucamonga Ranch, Cal..............................................................................August 31, 1864.
Drum Barracks, Cal..............................................................................September 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal...................................................................................December 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal..................................................................................... January 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal................................................................................... February 28, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal........................................................................................March 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal..........................................................................................April 30, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal...........................................................................................May 31, 1865.
In the field, Dun Glen, Nev...........................................................................June 30, 1865.
In the field, Gravelly Ford, Humboldt River, Nev.........................................July 31, 1865.
In the field, Dun Glen, Nev.......................................................................August 31, 1865.
Camp No. 64, near Denver City. Col...................................................September 30, 1865.
In the field, Dun Glen, Nev..................................................................September 30, 1865.
Dun Glen, Nev..........................................................................................October 31, 1865.
Dun Glen, Nev......................................................................................November 30, 1865.
Dun Glen, Nev.......................................................................................December 31, 1865.
Dun Glen, Nev...........................................................................................January 31, 1866.
Dun Glen, Nev........................................................................................ February 28, 1866.
In the field, Black Rock Mountains, Pine Forest District, Nev...................March 31, 1866.
Dun Glen, Nev...............................................................................................April 30, 1866.

Company C

Camp Alert, Cal. .....................................................................................October 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................November 30, 1861.
Fort Crook, Cal.....................................................................................December 31, 1861.
Fort Crook, Cal.........................................................................................January 31, 1862.
Fort Crook, Cal. .....................................................................................February 28, 1862.
Fort Crook, Cal...........................................................................................March 31, 1862.
Fort Crook, Cal. ...........................................................................................April 30, 1862.
Fort Crook, Cal. ............................................................................................May 31, 1862.
Fort Crook, Cal. ............................................................................................June 30, 1862.
Fort Crook, Cal...............................................................................................July 31, 1862.
Fort Crook, Cal..........................................................................................August 31, 1862.
Fort Crook, Cal. ..................................................................................September 30, 1862.
Fort Crook, Cal. ......................................................................................October 31, 1862.
Fort Crook, Cal. ..................................................................................November 30, 1862.
Fort Crook, Cal. ..................................................................................December 31, 1862.
Fort Crook, Cal. ......................................................................................January 31, 1863.
Fort Crook, Cal. ....................................................................................February 28, 1863.
Fort Crook, Cal. ........................................................................................March 31, 1863.
Fort Crook, Cal. .........................................................................................April 30, 1863.
Fort Crook, Cal............................................................................................May 31, 1863.
Fort Crook, Cal. ..........................................................................................June 30, 1863.
Fort Crook, Cal. ...........................................................................................July 30, 1863.
Fort Crook, Cal. ......................................................................................August 31, 1863.
Fort Crook, Cal. .................................................................................September 30, 1863.
Fort Crook, Cal.......................................................................................October 31, 1863.
Fort Crook, Cal...................................................................................November 30, 1863.
Fort Crook, Cal...................................................................................December 31, 1863.
Fort Crook, Cal.......................................................................................January 31, 1864.
Fort Crook, Cal.....................................................................................February 29, 1864.
Fort Crook, Cal.........................................................................................March 31, 1864.
Fort Crook, Cal..........................................................................................April 30, 1864.
Fort Crook, Cal...........................................................................................May 31, 1864.
Fort Crook, Cal...........................................................................................June 30, 1864.
Fort Crook, Cal............................................................................................July 31, 1864.
Fort Crook, Cal.......................................................................................August 31, 1864.
Fort Crook, Cal.................................................................................September 30, 1864.
Fort Crook, Cal.....................................................................................October 31, 1864.
Fort Crook, Cal.................................................................................November 30, 1864.
Fort Crook, Cal... ..............................................................................December 31, 1864.
Fort Crook, Cal..................................................................................... January 31, 1865.
Fort Crook, Cal................................................................................... February 28, 1865.
Fort Crook, Cal........................................................................................March 31, 1865.
Fort Crook, Cal..........................................................................................April 30, 1865.
Fort Crook, Cal...........................................................................................May 31, 1865.
Fort Crook, Cal...........................................................................................June 30, 1865
Fort Bidwell, Cal......................................................................................August 7, 1865.
Susanville, Cal....................................................................................September 1, 1865.
Fort Crook, Cal.................................................................................September 30, 1865.
Fort Crook, Cal.................................................................................... October 31, 1865.
Fort Crook, Cal.................................................................................November 30, 1865.
Fort Crook, Cal.................................................................................December 31, 1865.
Fort Crook, Cal.....................................................................................January 31, 1866.
Fort Crook, Cal.................................................................................. February 28, 1866.
Fort Crook, Cal...................................................................................... March 31, 1866.
Fort Crook, Cal.........................................................................................April 30, 1866.

Company D

Company Guidon, Company D, Regiment of Cavalry, California Volunteers (California State Capitol Museum)

 

Camp Alert, Cal. .....................................................................................October 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................November 30, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal....................................................................................December 31, 1861.
Camp Drum, Cal..................................................................................... January 31, 1862.
Camp Drum, Cal. ...................................................................................February 28, 1862.
No record of the stations of this company from February 28, 1862 to April 30, 1863.
Camp Independence, Owens River Valley, Cal.........................................April 30, 1863.
Camp Independence, Owens River Valley, Cal......................................... May 31, 1863.
Camp Independence, Owens River Valley, Cal. ........................................June 30, 1863.
Fort Tejon, Cal. ...........................................................................................July 30, 1863.
Fort Tejon, Cal. ......................................................................................August 31, 1863.
Fort Tejon, Cal. .................................................................................September 30, 1863.
Fort Tejon, Cal.......................................................................................October 31, 1863.
Fort Tejon, Cal...................................................................................November 30, 1863.
Fort Tejon, Cal...................................................................................December 31, 1863.
Fort Tejon, Cal.......................................................................................January 31, 1864.
Fort Tejon, Cal.....................................................................................February 29, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal......................................................................................March 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal........................................................................................April 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal.........................................................................................May 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal.........................................................................................June 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal..........................................................................................July 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal.....................................................................................August 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal...............................................................................September 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal...................................................................................October 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal...............................................................................November 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal... ............................................................................December 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal....................................................................................January 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal..................................................................................February 28, 1865.
Camp Jackson, near Ione City, Cal..........................................................March 31, 1865.
Camp Jackson, near Ione City, Cal............................................................April 30, 1865.
Pierson's Ranch, Colusa County, Cal..........................................................May 31, 1865.
Camp Waite, Antelope Creek, near Red Bluff, Cal....................................June 30, 1865.
Smoke Creek, Nev.......................................................................................July 31, 1865.
Smoke Creek, Nev..................................................................................August 31, 1865.
Smoke Creek, Nev.............................................................................September 30, 1865.
Smoke Creek, Nev.................................................................................October 31, 1865.
Smoke Creek, Nev.............................................................................November 30, 1865.
Smoke Creek, Nev.............................................................................December 31, 1865.
Smoke Creek, Nev.................................................................................January 31, 1866.
Smoke Creek, Nev...............................................................................February 28, 1866.
Smoke Creek, Nev...................................................................................March 31, 1866.
Smoke Creek, Nev.....................................................................................April 30, 1866.

Company E

National Color, Tuolumne Rangers, Company E, 2nd Regiment of Cavalry, California Volunteers (California State Capitol Museum)

 

Camp Alert, Cal. .....................................................................................October 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................November 30, 1861.
Fort Humboldt, Cal..............................................................................December 31, 1861.
Fort Humboldt, Cal..................................................................................January 31, 1862.
Fort Humboldt, Cal. ..............................................................................February 28, 1862.
No record of the stations of this company from February 28, 1862 to April 30, 1863.
Big Pine Creek, near Camp Independence, Cal.........................................April 30, 1863.
Camp Independence, Cal............................................................................ May 31, 1863.
Camp Independence, Cal ............................................................................June 30, 1863.
Fort Tejon, Cal..............................................................................................July 30, 1863.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal..............................................................August 31, 1863.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal.........................................................September 30, 1863.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal.............................................................October 31, 1863.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal.........................................................November 30, 1863.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal.........................................................December 31, 1863.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal.............................................................January 31, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal...........................................................February 29, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal...............................................................March 31, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal.................................................................April 30, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal..................................................................May 31, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal..................................................................June 30, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal...................................................................July 31, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal..............................................................August 31, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal........................................................September 30, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal............................................................October 31, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal........................................................November 30, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal........................................................December 31, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal.............................................................January 31, 1865.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal...........................................................February 28, 1865.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal...............................................................March 31, 1865.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal.................................................................April 30, 1865.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal..................................................................May 31, 1865.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal..................................................................June 30, 1865.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal...................................................................July 31, 1865.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal..............................................................August 31, 1865.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal........................................................September 30, 1865.
Camp Babbitt, near Visalia, Cal............................................................October 31, 1865.
Camp Independence, Cal...................................................................November 30, 1865.
Camp Independence, Cal...................................................................December 31, 1865.
Camp Independence, Cal.......................................................................January 31, 1866.
Camp Independence, Cal.....................................................................February 28, 1866.
Camp Independence, Cal.........................................................................March 31, 1866.
Camp Independence, Cal...........................................................................April 30, 1866.

Company F

Camp Alert, Cal. .....................................................................................October 31, 1861.
Benicia Arsenal, Cal............................................................................November 30, 1861.
Benicia Arsenal, Cal.............................................................................December 31, 1861.
Benicia Arsenal, Cal................................................................................January 31, 1862.
Benicia Arsenal, Cal..............................................................................February 28, 1862.
No record from February, 1862 to April, 1863.
Camp Union, Cal.......................................................................................April 30, 1863.
Camp Union, Cal........................................................................................ May 31, 1863.
Camp Union, Cal.........................................................................................June 30, 1863.
Camp Bidwell, Butte County, Cal...............................................................,July 30, 1863.
Camp Bidwell, Butte County, Cal...........................................................August 31, 1863.
Camp Bidwell, Butte County, Cal......................................................September 30, 1863.
Camp Bidwell, Butte County, Cal..........................................................October 31, 1863.
Camp Bidwell, Butte County, Cal......................................................November 30, 1863.
Camp Bidwell, Butte County, Cal......................................................December 31, 1863.
Camp Bidwell, Butte County, Cal..........................................................January 31, 1864.
Camp Bidwell, Butte County, Cal........................................................February 29, 1864.
Camp Bidwell, Butte County, Cal............................................................March 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal........................................................................................April 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal.........................................................................................May 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal.........................................................................................June 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal..........................................................................................July 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal.....................................................................................August 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal...............................................................................September 30, 1864.
Bear Valley, Cal.....................................................................................October 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal...............................................................................November 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal......................................................................................January 1, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal....................................................................................February 1, 1865.
Ione Valley, Cal..........................................................................................March 1, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal..........................................................................................April 1, 1865.
Colusa, Cal.....................................................................................................May 1, 1865.
Montgomery Creek, Shasta County, Cal., en route for Fort Crook, Shasta County,
Cal.....................................................................................................June 1, 1865.
Fort Crook, Shasta Co., Cal.......................................................................... July 1, 1865.
Fort Bidwell, Siskiyou County, Cal..........................................................August 1, 1865.
Fort Bidwell, Siskiyou County, Cal....................................................September 1, 1865.
Fort Bidwell, Siskiyou County, Cal...................................................September 30, 1865.
Fort Bidwell, Siskiyou County, Cal.......................................................October 31, 1865.
Smoke Creek, Nevada..........................................................................December 1, 1865.
Fort Crook, Shasta Co., Cal................................................................December 31, 1865.
Fort Crook, Shasta Co., Cal....................................................................January 31, 1866.
Fort Bidwell, Siskiyou County, Cal...........................................................March 1, 1866.
Fort Bidwell, Siskiyou County, Cal..............................................................April 1, 1866.
Fort Bidwell, Siskiyou County, Cal...............................................................May 1, 1866.
Goose Lake, Cal...........................................................................................May 31, 1866.

Company G

Camp Alert, Cal. .....................................................................................October 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................November 30, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................December 31, 1861.
Camp Drum, Cal......................................................................................January 31, 1862.
Camp Latham, Cal. ...............................................................................February 28, 1862.
No record of the stations of this company from February 28, 1862 to April 30, 1863, can be found..
Camp Independence, Owens Valley, Cal..................................................April 30, 1863.
Camp Independence, Owens Valley, Cal.................................................. .May 31, 1863.
Camp Independence, Owens Valley, Cal......................................................July 1, 1863.
Camp Independence, Owens Valley, Cal..................................................August 1, 1863.
Camp Leonard, Cal..............................................................................September 1, 1863.
Camp Leonard, Cal..................................................................................October 1, 1863.
Fort Tejon, Cal.....................................................................................November 1, 1863.
Fort Tejon, Cal.....................................................................................December 1, 1863.
Fort Tejon, Cal........................................................................................January 1, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, Cal.................................................................................February 1, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, Cal.....................................................................................March 1, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, Cal......................................................................................April 1, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, Cal........................................................................................May 1, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, Cal.......................................................................................June 1, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, Cal........................................................................................July 1, 1864.
Camp Babbitt, Cal....................................................................................August 1, 1864.
San Luis Ranche, en route from Camp Babbitt To Camp Union, Cal....August 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal.....................................................................................October 1, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal.................................................................................November 1, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal...............................................................................November 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal...............................................................................December 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal....................................................................................February 1, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal..................................................................................February 28, 1865.
Camp near Hornitos, Mariposa County, Cal.............................................March 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal........................................................................................April 30, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal.........................................................................................May 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal.........................................................................................June 30, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal..........................................................................................July 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal.....................................................................................August 31, 1865.
Benicia, Cal.......................................................................................September 30, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal....................................................................................October 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal................................................................................November 30, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal................................................................................December 31, 1865.

Company H

Camp Alert, Cal. .....................................................................................October 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................November 30, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................December 31, 1861.
Fort Churchill, Nev..................................................................................January 31, 1862.
Fort Churchill, Nev ...............................................................................February 28, 1862.
No record of the stations of this company from February 28, 1862 to April 30, 1864, can be found..
Camp Relief, U.T.......................................................................................April 30, 1864.
Camp Conness, I.T......................................................................................May 31, 1864.
Camp Conness, I.T.......................................................................................June 30, 1864.
Camp Conness, I.T........................................................................................July 31, 1864.
Camp Conness, I.T...................................................................................August 31, 1864.
Camp Douglas, U.T............................................................................September 30, 1864.
Camp No. 4, en route from Camp Douglas, U.T., to Camp Union, Cal..October 31, 1864.
Fort Churchill, Nev., en route to Camp Union, Cal............................November 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal.................................................................................December 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal.....................................................................................January 31, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal..................................................................................February 28, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal.......................................................................................March 31, 1865.
Provost Barracks, Sacramento, Cal............................................................April 30, 1865.
Provost Barracks, Sacramento, Cal.............................................................May 31, 1865.
Provost Barracks, Sacramento, Cal..............................................................July 31, 1865.
Los Angeles, en route to Drum Barracks, Cal...................................September 30, 1865.
Drum Barracks, Cal................................................................................October 31, 1865.
Drum Barracks, Cal............................................................................November 30, 1865.
Drum Barracks, Cal.............................................................................December 31, 1865.
Drum Barracks, Cal................................................................................February 1, 1866.

Company I

Company I, 2nd Regiment of Cavalry, California Volunteers (California State Capitol Museum)

 

Camp Alert, Cal. .....................................................................................October 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................November 30, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................December 31, 1861.
Camp Drum, Cal......................................................................................January 31, 1862.
Camp Latham, Cal. ...............................................................................February 28, 1862.
No record of the stations of this company from February 28, 1862 to April 30, 1863, can be found.
Camp Babbitt, Cal......................................................................................April 30, 1863.
Camp Babbitt, Cal..................................................................................... .May 31, 1863.
Camp Babbitt, Cal.......................................................................................June 30, 1863.
Camp Babbitt, Cal........................................................................................July 31, 1863.
Camp Babbitt, Cal...................................................................................August 31, 1863.
Camp Babbitt, Cal...................................................................................October 1, 1863.
Camp Babbitt, Cal...............................................................................November 1, 1863.
Camp Babbitt, Cal................................................................................December 1, 1863.
Camp Babbitt, Cal....................................................................................January 1, 1864.
St. Luis Camp, Cal..................................................................................January 31, 1864.
Benicia Barracks, Cal...............................................................................March 31, 1864.
Benicia Barracks, Cal...............................................................................April 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal.........................................................................................June 4, 1864.
Camp Bidwell, Cal......................................................................................July 31, 1864.
Camp Bidwell, Cal.................................................................................August 31, 1864.
Camp Bidwell, Cal............................................................................September 30, 1864.
Camp Bidwell, Cal.................................................................................October 31, 1864.
Camp Bidwell, Cal............................................................................November 30, 1864.
Camp Bidwell, Cal............................................................................December 31, 1864.
Camp Bidwell, Cal..................................................................................January 30, 1865.
Camp Bidwell, Cal...............................................................................February 28, 1865.
Camp Bidwell, Cal...................................................................................March 31, 1865.
Camp Bidwell, Cal.....................................................................................April 30, 1865.
Camp No. 8..................................................................................................May 31, 1865.
Camp No. 16, Otter Creek, Nev...................................................................June 30, 1865.
Queens River Station, Nev...........................................................................July 31, 1865.
Camp McDermit, Nev.............................................................................August 31, 1865.
Camp McDermit, Nev.......................................................................September 30, 1865.
Camp McDermit, Nev.............................................................................October 31, 1865.
Camp McDermit, Nev.........................................................................November 30, 1865.

Company K

Camp Alert, Cal. .....................................................................................October 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................November 30, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................December 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal.......................................................................................January 31, 1862.
Camp Alert, Cal..... ...............................................................................February 28, 1862.
No record of the stations occupied by this company from February, 1862 to March, 1863, can be found.
_________...............................................................................................March 31, 1863.
Fort Ruby, Nev..........................................................................................April 30, 1863.
Deep Creek, U.T.........................................................................................May 31, 1863.
Government Springs, U.T..........................................................................June 30, 1863.
Cedar Swamps, U.T....................................................................................July 31, 1863.
Fort Ruby, Nev.......................................................................................August 31, 1863.
Fort Ruby, Nev..................................................................................September 30, 1863.
Farmington, U.T....................................................................................October 31, 1863.
Camp Douglas, U.T...........................................................................November 30, 1863.
Camp Douglas, U.T...........................................................................December 31, 1863.
Camp Douglas, U.T...............................................................................January 31, 1864.
Camp Douglas, U.T.............................................................................February 28, 1864.
Camp Douglas, U.T.................................................................................March 31, 1864.
Camp Relief, U.T......................................................................................April 30, 1864.
Canon Creek, I.T........................................................................................May 31, 1864.
Camp Conness, I.T........................................................................................June 30, 1864.
Farmington, U.T.............................................................................................July 31, 1864.
Camp Conness, I.T....................................................................................August 31, 1864.
Camp Douglas, U.T.............................................................................September 30, 1864.
Camp No. 5 at Lovelands, U.T................................................................October 31, 1864.
Camp No. 33, Desert Wells, Nev.........................................................November 30, 1864.
Camp Union, Cal......................................................................................January 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal....................................................................................February 28, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal........................................................................................March 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal.........................................................................................April 30, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal..........................................................................................May 31, 1865.
Camp Union, Cal..........................................................................................June 30, 1865.
Camp No. 5, Chico, Cal................................................................................July 31, 1865.
Smoke Creek, Nev...................................................................................August 31, 1865.
Smoke Creek, Nev..................................................................................October 31, 1865.
Camp No. 4, en route to Fort Churchill, Nev.....................................November 30, 1865.
Fort Churchill, Nev.............................................................................December 31, 1865.
Fort Churchill, Nev.................................................................................January 31, 1866.
Fort Churchill, Nev...............................................................................February 28, 1866.
Fort Churchill, Nev...................................................................................March 31, 1866.
Fort Churchill, Nev........................................................................................May 1, 1866.

Company L

Camp Alert, Cal. .....................................................................................October 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................November 30, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................December 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal.......................................................................................January 31, 1862.
Camp Alert, Cal. ...................................................................................February 28, 1862.
No record of the stations occupied by this company from February, 1862 to April, 1863, can be found..
Camp at Bishop Creek, Owens River, Cal..................................................April 30, 1863.
Camp Independence, Owens Valley, Cal.....................................................May 31, 1863.
Fort Churchill, Nev.......................................................................................June 30, 1863.
Fort Ruby, Nev..............................................................................................July 31, 1863.
Camp Springs, en route to Salt Lake, U.T................................................August 31, 1863.
Camp Douglas, U.T............................................................................September 30, 1863.
Camp Douglas, U.T.................................................................................October 31, 1863.
Camp Douglas, U.T.............................................................................November 30, 1863.
Camp Douglas, U.T.............................................................................December 31, 1863.
Camp Douglas, U.T.................................................................................January 31, 1864.
Camp Douglas, U.T...............................................................................February 29, 1864.
Rush Valley, U.T.......................................................................................March 31, 1864.
Camp Relief, U.T........................................................................................April 30, 1864.
Camp Conness, I.T.........................................................................................May 31, 1864.
Bingham Creek, U.T.........................................................................................July 1, 1864.
Salt Lake City, U.T.....................................................................................August 31, 1864.
Salt Lake City, U.T.....................................................................................October 1, 1864.
Fort Bridger, Wy.T..................................................................................December 1, 1864.
Fort Bridger, Wy.T....................................................................................February 1, 1865.
Fort Bridger, Wy.T........................................................................................March 1, 1865.
Fort Bridger, Wy.T.......................................................................................April 30, 1865.
Camp No. 18, en route to Fort Laramie, Wy. T.............................................May 31, 1865.
Church Buttes, Salt Lake, U.T..................................................................October 31, 1865.
Government Reservation, RushValley, U.T..............................................January 31, 1866.
Government Reservation, RushValley, U.T.............................................. March 31, 1866.
Government Reservation, RushValley, U.T.................................................April 30, 1866.
Camp Douglas, U.T.......................................................................................May 31, 1866.
Camp Douglas, U.T.......................................................................................June 30, 1866.
Camp Douglas, U.T........................................................................................July 12, 1866.

Company M

Camp Alert, Cal. .....................................................................................October 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................November 30, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal...................................................................................December 31, 1861.
Camp Alert, Cal........................................................................................January 31, 1862.
Camp Alert, Cal...... ...............................................................................February 28, 1862.
No record of the stations occupied by this company from February, 1862 to May, 1863, can be found..
Fort Bridger, Wy. T.......................................................................................May 1, 1863.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T.....................................................................................June 30, 1863.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T......................................................................................July 31, 1863.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T..................................................................................August 31, 1863.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T.............................................................................September 30, 1863.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T.................................................................................October 31, 1863.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T.............................................................................November 30, 1863.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T....................................................................................January 1, 1864.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T..................................................................................February 2, 1864.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T....................................................................................March 31, 1864.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T.....................................................................................April 30, 1864.
Camp No. 21, Rio Virgin, Arizona...............................................................May 31, 1864.
(Salt Lake and Fort Mojave W.R. Expedition)
Camp No. 31, Fort Mojave, Arizona............................................................June 30, 1864.
(Salt Lake and Fort Mojave W.R. Expedition)
Camp No. 37, Muddy Creek, Arizona...........................................................July 31, 1864.
(Salt Lake and Fort Mojave W.R. Expedition)
Camp Conness, I.T...................................................................................August 31, 1864.
Camp Douglas, U.T.............................................................................September 30, 1864.
Camp Douglas, U.T.................................................................................October 31, 1864.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T..............................................................................November 30, 1864.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T..............................................................................December 31, 1864.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T..................................................................................January 31, 1865.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T................................................................................February 28, 1865.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T....................................................................................March 31, 1865.
Fort Bridger, Wy. T......................................................................................April 30, 1865.
Fort Laramie, Wy. T......................................................................................May 31, 1865.
Fort Laramie, Wy. T......................................................................................June 30, 1865.
Little Cottonwood Creek, D.T........................................................................July 31, 1865.
Tongue River, D.T.....................................................................................August 31, 1865.
North Platte River, D.T........................................................................September 30, 1865.
Church Buttes, U.T...................................................................................October 31, 1865.
Government Reservation, Rush Valley, U.T........................................November 30, 1865.
Government Reservation, Rush Valley, U.T........................................December 31, 1865.
Government Reservation, Rush Valley, U.T ...........................................January 31, 1866.
Government Reservation, Rush Valley, U.T..........................................February 28, 1866.
Government Reservation, Rush Valley, U.T .............................................March 31, 1866.
Government Reservation, Rush Valley, U.T................................................April 30, 1866.
Camp Douglas, U.T........................................................................................May 31, 1866.
Camp Douglas, U.T........................................................................................June 30, 1866.

Rosters

Officers

Companies

A B C D E F G H I K L M


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