Historic California Posts, Camps, Stations and Airfields
Fort Miley: Battery Loren H. Call
 
 
Battery Loren H. Call
by Gordon Chappell, National Park Service
 
Battery Loren H. Call was built for the 5 inch M1900 guns mounted on M1903 pedestal mounts removed from Battery Ledyard, Fort McDowell, during the Japanese scare of 1914-1915. It was completed in 1916 and decommissioned in 1921. Battery Call was disarmed in 1921, the guns sent to Watervliet Arsenal. The carriages were dismounted scrapped and sold to a John W. Smith of San Francisco sometime thereafter.
 
The battery was named for aviation pioneer First Lieutenant Loren H. Call who was killed in an airplane crash at Texas City, TX on 9 July 1913. The emplacement was destroyed by subsequent construction for the Veterans Hospital.
 
 
Battery Loren H. Call
by Justin Ruhge
 
The two 5-inch guns and pedestals for this battery were transferred from Battery Ledyard on Angel Island. This battery was to have its own magazine and plotting room located under the traverse between the guns.

Construction of this new and simple battery was completed in September 1915. This work was turned over to the Coast Artillery Corps in June 1916.
 
General Orders 23, War Department, April 27, 1915, named this battery Lorne H. Call in honor of First Lieutenant Loren H. Call, Coast Artillery Corps, who was killed on July 8, 1913, while making an airplane flight in the line of duty.
 
Battery Call continued to function throughout World War I. However, in 1921, its guns were dismounted and shipped to the Watervliet Arsenal in New York. The carriages were dismounted, scrapped, and sold to John W. Smith, San Francisco. The date that the Army considered the battery abandoned is unknown. With the establishment of a veterans' hospital at Fort Miley, the emplacements of this battery were destroyed.
 
 
Report of Completed Works - Seacoast Fortifications
 
 
Report of Completed Works - Seacoast Fortifications: Battery Loren H. Call and associated structures
 
 
Other Online or Printed Histories
 
Harbor Defenses of San Francisco - A Field Guide 1890 to 1950
FortWiki
 
 
 
Updated 2 January 2016