California State Military Department
The California State Military Museum
Preserving California's Military Heritage
California and the Indian Wars
The Mendocino War of 1859-1860
 
 
White Man's Cattle, Red Man's Game: Issues in the Mendocino War
The Yuki Case, 1851–1910
The Legislature's Majority and Minority Reports on the Mendocino War (1860)
Records of the Mendocino War at the California State Archives, Sacramento
 
White Man's Cattle, Red Man's Game: Issues in the Mendocino War
By Ed Bigelow
 
The following article originally appeared in the the November 24, 1952 issue of the Paul Bunyon News of Fort Bragg. It has not been edited to take into account modern sensitivities to California's Native American population.
 
As the white man's civilization rolled westward, the American Indian was pushed further toward the setting sun until the Pacific Ocean ended further retreat. When the white men came into the state of California, either in covered wagon across the plains, or around the Horn, the California Indian was herded onto reservations. One of these was the Mendocino reservation on which the Nome Cult farm was located.
 
At this time, about 1858, there were 10,000 Indians in the country, of which only 3,200 consented to live as the white man directed. The remainder tried to continue life as it was before their conquerors came. The settlers erected fences and brought in cattle which caused the wild life to diminish, thus working a hardship on the Indian.
 
Mostly as a means of subsistence, the Indian began killing the settlers' cattle. In many instances they killed for revenge against the usurpers. Each time the settlers came upon a dead cow, they blamed the Indians for the deed and would promptly raid an Indian rancheria, killing men, women and children, indiscriminately.
 
A private army of 40 men was organized under the command of Captain W.W. Jarboe of Ukiah, to punish the Indians. At this time there was a unit of the U.S. Army --the 6th Infantry--composed of 23 men and commanded by Lt. Edward Dillon, a 25 year old soldier. The unit was stationed in Round Valley. The settlers complained that the regular army protected the Indians and not the settlers. A bitter animosity existed between Dillon and the settlers.
 
Open warfare broke out between the settlers and the Indians. The redmen raided the white's cattle and the whites killed any and Indians they suspected of killing cattle.
 
A special California house and senate committee was finally sent to Mendocino in 1860 to investigate what they called the "Mendocino War." The committee under the chairmanship of J.B. Lamar, met in February 1860 at Storm's Ranch in Round Valley to hear the settlers tell their story and to take depositions.
 
William Frazier, a 38 year old farmer of Long Valley, told the committee he and others raided an Indian village after hearing of cattle killing and that the redmen had some fresh killed beef at their rancheria.
 
"All the Indians fled when we came, but one," he said. "We shot his head off."
 
"Last December (1859) we organized a company of 40 men. I was elected Lieutenant. Two days later I led an expedition across Eel River between Long and Round Valleys and saw a fire of an Indian rancheria. We waited until sun up before attacking and killed 20 of them, including bucks, squaws and children and took two women and one child prisoner.
 
"A week later," he continued, "we found two wounded bucks and one old squaw, all of whom we killed," and on the way home saw more Indians, Charles S. Bournes, Round Valley rancher, continued the tale. He said: "The regular troops here were just a nuisance and never accomplished any good; they protected the Indians and not the settlers."
 
William T. Scott of Scott Valley, told the committee he had never had any trouble with the Indians. He said that Jarboe's orders were to kill all Indians seen. "I went with Jarboe once and came across two bucks collecting acorns in Eden Valley. We killed one, but the other got away." In the statement Scott made, March 2, 1860 he said he had always treated the Indians kindly and never had any cattle killed by them."
 
An employee of the Nome Cult farm, Lawrence Battaile, 36, testified that S.P. Storms and other settlers one day came out to the farm on the reservation on suspicion that some of the reservation Indians had been killing cattle.
 
The settlers, said Battaile, picked out 20 redmen, accused them of killing and started shooting them. Eight redmen were shot and five hung the rest managed to escape. Storms, 29, a rancher of Round Valley said over 500 Indians had been killed in the county in the three and a half years preceding.
 
When he was asked if many squaws were killed by the settlers, H.L. Hall, 25, refused to answer the committee's question. "I think one squaw died from a bullet and all the squaws in one particular incident were killed before they would not travel. The infants were put out of their misery and one 10 year old girl was killed for being stubborn," he said.
 
"I consider it dangerous for any white man to travel along the roads in this area," William Patterson, 31, of Ukiah Valley, said. "I know of 10 or 15 white men who have been killed by Indians."
 
The special joint committee on the Mendocino War heard over 45 witnesses and made their report.
 
Jasper O'Farrell, W.B. Dickinson and W.B. Maxson of the committee made the majority report of the hearing. They said the white men were to blame for the Indian troubles and that in four months of 1860, more Indians of Mendocino county had been killed than in a century of Spanish and Mexican rule.
 
In the minority report, J.B. Lamar said the Indians were a cowardly lot and proposed a system of peonage. The Indians, under this proposal would be assigned as servants to the local ranchers and laws would be passed to prevent any third party from interfering between "master and servant."
 
It is not known what good came of this committee's investigation or what solution finally developed, if any. The committee's report and depositions of the local settlers are believed to be the only record of the little known Mendocino Indian War.
 
The Yuki Case, 1851–1910
Extracted from Patterns of frontier genocide 1803–1910: the Aboriginal Tasmanians, the Yuki of California, and the Herero of Namibia; Journal of Genocide Research, June 2004
by Benjamin Madley

On February 2, 1848 the United States took possession of California from Mexico. Ten months later, news of the gold found at Sutter’s Mill triggered a tidal wave of immigration into the new state. Between 1849 and 1851 alone nearly 250,000 settlers arrived (Cook, 1970, p 28). These immigrants needed food and triggered an agricultural explosion that in turn created shock waves of land grabbing. In 1851 the first white explorers visited the Yuki homeland, in northern California, and in 1854 settlers arrived to farm and ranch the area’s fertile valleys. Before whites arrived, the Yuki numbered between 5,000 and 20,000. By 1864, settlement policies and a war of genocide had reduced them to “85 male[s] and 215 female[s]” (Carranco and Beard, 1981, p 126). Genocidal policies then continued into the twentieth century, further reducing the population.

Like the Aboriginal Tasmanians, the Yuki came into conflict with settlers over natural resources, land, the abduction of their children, and the enslavement and mistreatment of their women. Likewise, the Yuki rose up only to be hunted nearly to extinction and incarcerated in lethal ethnic gulags. Indeed, these genocides demonstrate remarkable similarities.

Soon after white settlers arrived in 1854, their pastoral activities began to threaten the Yuki hunter/gatherer economy. The Yuki depended on hunting deer and birds, fishing for steelhead and salmon, and gathering insects, nuts, seeds, tubers, and wild plants for survival (Carranco and Beard, 1981, pp 18–19). The lush meadows and river valleys where these Yuki staples thrived were also the best places for building houses, tilling the earth, and grazing livestock. Settlers’ hogs, cattle, and horses set out to pasture in these areas consumed the core of the Yuki diet. Further, the settlers’ domesticated animals drove wild game away from prime grazing areas thus depriving the Yuki of meat.

As in Tasmania, competition for natural resources generated conflict. Settlers occupied traditional Yuki hunting, fishing, and gathering grounds, denying them to the Yuki and forcing the Yuki to the point of starvation. According to settler John Burgess, who lived in the Yuki homeland:

I saw a man driving some squaws from a clover field… they were picking clover or digging roots; he said he would be damned if he would allow them to dig roots or pick clover, as he wanted it for hay. (Carranco and Beard, 1981, p 68)

In the face of the sudden and intense competition for access to natural resources, many Yuki radically changed their lives in order to eat. They retreated into mountain areas where they faced the twin challenges of fewer food sources and violent encounters with hostile tribes.

Without access to productive land and fearful of the dangers associated with hunting and gathering on neighboring tribes’ lands, Yuki began killing settlers’ stock to survive (Miller, 1978, pp 249–254). The San Francisco Bulletin noted on January 21, 1860 that due to their “condition bordering on starvation … [the Yuki] are committing serious depredations on the stock” (San Francisco Bulletin, January 21, 1860).

A dearth of written records obscures Yuki thinking, but their attacks on settlers’ livestock were also likely intended to exact revenge for dispossession, loss of food, the enslavement of children and the abduction and mistreatment of women. As one settler noted, “the treatment received by the Indians from some of the white settlers has tended to exasperate them and cause them to destroy stock in a spirit of revenge” (Heizer and Almquist, 1971, p 39).

Forcibly indenturing Indians was legal in California from 1850 to 1863. On April 22, 1850, the state legislature passed “An Act for the Government and Protection of Indians” into law, providing for the indenture or apprenticeship of California Indians (Carranco and Beard, 1981, p 40; Castillo, 1978, p 109; Hurtado, 1988, pp 129–131). This legislation led to widespread kidnapping of Yuki children. When Indian Agent Simon Storms visited a Round Valley Yuki encampment in 1856 he found that “a number of squaws and children had been taken away by white men, which was the principal reason they were so much afraid of whites” (Carranco and Beard, 1981, p 40). Indian Agent Vincent Geiger reported in 1857 that “the Indians … have very few children, most of them doubtless having been stolen and sold” while in 1858 a settler noted what appeared to be kidnappings: “In coming into the valley, on the first occasion, I met a man with two Indian boys taking them off, and the third time I came on the trail, I met a man taking off a girl” (Carranco and Beard, 1981, p 61). There are no written records of stolen Yuki children ever returning to the tribe.

Few white women migrated to California with the Gold Rush. To obtain sex and labor, white settlers abducted and enslaved Indian women, including the Yuki. According to genocide scholars Frank Chalk and Kurt Jonassohn, stolen Yuki women became “temporary harvest hands, household servants, and camp wives” (Chalk and Jonassohn, 1990, p 197). Written evidence of Yuki reactions to these kidnappings are not extant, but Sherburne Cook suggests that abduction and abuse of Yuki women were causes of violent conflict between the Yuki and settlers (Cooke, 1976, p 278).

Between 1856 and 1859 the Yuki began attacking first livestock, and then both stock and a limited number of settlers. The conflict was always asymmetrical. California Indians were prohibited from owning guns and records suggest that the Yuki primarily relied on bows and arrows. Despite the disparity in firepower and the fact that the Yuki rarely killed whites, settlers responded with massacres of increasing scale (Heizer, 1974, p 11). Farmer John Lawson explained, in 1856, that when “I lost twenty hogs … [I] went after the Indians … shot three [and] five … were tried at the reservation, found guilty and hanged” (Carranco and Beard, 1981, p 59). Settler Dryden Lawson stated in 1860 that:
 
… in 1856 the first expedition by the whites against the Indians was made … these expeditions were formed by gathering together a few white men whenever the Indians committed depredations on their stock; there were so many expeditions that I cannot recollect the number…we would kill on average fifty or sixty Indians on a trip …frequently we would have to turn out two or three times a week. (Carranco and Beard, 1981, p 40)
 

 


Between 1857 and 1858 the Yuki killed four white men in attacks that appear to have motivated settlers to perpetrate increasingly large massacres. In May 1859, Round Valley settlers avenged the killing of a single prize stallion with the slaughter of 240 Yuki (Carranco and Beard, 1981, pp 64–65, 82). Responding to the increasing violence of the summer of 1859, the editor of the Sacramento Union wrote: “The aborigines are melting away as the snows of the mountains in June … they are doomed to steady extirpation” (Sacramento Union, August 22, 1859).

On September 6, 1859 California Governor John Weller intervened to sanction genocide by granting a state commission to Walter Jarboe, a notorious Indian killer whose “Eel River Rangers” had already murdered 62 Yuki men, women and children that year (Carranco and Beard, 1981, pp 90–91, 89). Despite these killings, Weller considered the Yuki a threat requiring even more extreme measures. A San Francisco Bulletin editorial even suggested, “Extermination is the quickest and cheapest remedy, and effectually prevents all other difficulties when an outbreak [of Indian violence] occurs” (San Francisco Bulletin, September 1, 1856). When US Army generals refused to order their troops to join the war against the Yuki, Weller hired Jarboe and his “Rangers.”

Five months later, in January 1860, Weller disbanded the “Eel River Rangers” and Jarboe presented his final report to the new Governor of California, John Downey: “from … [September 20] to the 24th of January[1860], I have fought them twenty-three times, killed 283 warriors, the number of wounded was not known, took 292 prisoners, sent them to the Reservation” (Carranco and Beard, 1981, pp 95–96). Jarboe then presented the state with a $11,143 bill for his expeditions (San Francisco Bulletin, February 24, 1860). Given his previous record for killing scores of women and children, Jarboe’s official account cannot be trusted. He lists only men killed. Yet, if his previous activities are any indicator, he and his death squad did not discriminate between men, women, and children. All were likely targeted.

Governor Weller understood that Jarboe would kill women and children as well as the California press did. By February 1860, despite its earlier editorial, the San Francisco Bulletin was shocked and criticized Jarboe’s actions as a “Deliberate, cowardly, brutal massacre of defenseless men, women, and children …” (San Francisco Bulletin, February 24, 1860). In March of the same year, San Francisco Herald editor John Nugent attacked the government’s genocide with biting wit:

I propose to the legislature to create the office of Indian Butcher with the princely salary conferred upon the man who has killed the most Indians in a given time provided it is
satisfactorily shown that the Indians were unarmed at the time and the greater of them were squaws and papooses [women and children]. (San Francisco Herald, March 5, 1860)

Governor Weller had officially sanctioned genocide. He understood that by commissioning Jarboe he would unleash a force with a proven record of killing women and children and that it would annihilate most, if not all, Yukis. The government of California sanctioned and paid for Weller’s genocide policy and Jarboe’s execution of it. On April 12, 1860 the California state legislature appropriated $9,347.39 for “payment of the indebtedness incurred by the expedition against the Indians in the county of Mendocino organized under the
command of Captain W.S. Jarboe in the year 1859” (Carranco and Beard, 1981, p 97). Jarboe’s 292 prisoners then joined other Yuki at the Round Valley Reservation.

The Round Valley Reservation was established in 1854 as a collection point for the Yuki as well as a number of other northern California tribes. In 1857 Special Indian Agent Browne reported that “some 3,000 Indians” were living on the reservation (Carranco and Beard, 1981, p 58). No records exist to show exactly how many Yuki died there. However, it is clear that even as Indians were continually brought to the reservation in the hundreds, the population steadily declined as a result of malnutrition, the abduction of women and children, rape and consequent venereal disease, and constant settler attacks. Although ostensibly created to protect the Yuki, in practice Round Valley bore striking resemblances to the Tasmanian ethnic gulag on Flinders Island. Inadequate rations led to malnutrition, disease, and subsequent death. In 1858 a reporter from the San Francisco Alta California visited the reservation and gushed:

There is …an abundance of food …to supply the immediate wants of a vast multitude of Indians, and in a short time, their labor might produce an adequate supply of grain and vegetables for the entire aboriginal population of this State. (Steamer Edition, San Francisco Alta California, May 27, p 1858)

But those Yuki working on the reservation farm were provided only a starvation diet. Rations consisted of six ears of corn per worker per day or flour with which to bake bread; those who did not work were not given food (Carranco and Beard, 1981, p 68; Heizer, 1974, p 106). To supplement these insufficient rations, the Yuki turned to foraging and hunting on the reservation (Heizer, 1974, p 106). Here too they confronted a penal system designed to destroy them: ranchers were allowed to graze their livestock on the reservation, thus destroying the seeds, plants, tubers, and acorns the Yuki were foraging for. Without sufficient nutrition immune systems weakened and many Yuki succumbed to disease.

The abduction and rape of Yuki women increased the reservation mortality rate. Despite US Army soldiers stationed on the reservation to protect the Yuki, Round Valley was no safe haven. Lieutenant Edward Dillon, based on the reservation, reported “It is a common occurrence to have squaws taken by force from the place” (Carranco and Beard, 1981, p 61). Frequent rapes brought death by spreading venereal diseases through the Yuki reservation community. According to an 1859 petition sent by Tehama County settlers to the US Secretary of the Interior, the agent in charge of the reservation was “compelling the squaws, even in the presence of their Indian husbands to submit to (he and his cronies’) lecherous and beastly desires,” thus introducing “among them diseases of the most loathsome character” (Heizer, 1974, p 139). When Simon Storms entered Round Valley in June 1856 he noted that not a single Indian was “affected with the venereal,” but by August 1858 he reported “about one-fifth are now diseased” (Carranco and Beard, 1981, p 61).

The reservation even became a shooting gallery for white settlers. Without the authority to arrest white men beyond the reservation, US Army soldiers had little ability to pursue and punish whites that attacked the Yuki. Settlers would commit a crime on the reservation and slip over the line of safety. Moreover, because the California legislature excluded Indians from serving as witnesses “for or against any white” in the California court system, it was virtually impossible to charge those suspected of victimizing Yuki on the reservation (Heizer, 1974, p 5). With little fear of consequences, whites killed those incarcerated on the reservation with impunity. As Captain Johnson, charged with protecting the reservation, explained of the Yuki, “they had always been told by the white man ‘come on the reservation; we do not want to kill you,’ but they had been invariably deceived and killed, and now they did not know whom to believe” (Tassin, 1887, p 29). In 1859 Captain Johnson warned, “I believe it to be the settled determination of many of the [white] inhabitants to exterminate the Indians,” but given the laws he could “see no way of preventing it …” (Carranco and Beard, 1981, p 90).

Long after the war was over, reservation policies continued to destroy the Yuki. According to Sherburne Cook, starvation and sickness combined with settler encroachment and attacks to destroy 80% of the Yuki on the reservation between 1873 and 1910 (Cook, 1976, p 238). Thus, the reservation system continued the genocide into the twentieth century. As on Flinders Island, there was a clearly discernible record of steadily declining population at Round Valley. The US and California governments may not have set out to destroy the
Yuki at Round Valley, but they, like the colonial government of Tasmania, did little or nothing to correct this process despite years of evidence indicating that extermination was under way and that official policies contributed to it.

Today approximately 100 Yuki live in Mendocino County on the Round Valley Indian Reservation together with members of five other California Indian nations. Fewer than a dozen native Yuki speakers remain.

The Legislature's Majority and Minority Reports on the Mendocino War (1860)
Extracted from Early California Laws and Policies Related to California Indians
By Kimberly Johnston-Dodds, California Research Bureau, California State Library, September 2002

In 1860, the California Legislature created a Joint Special Committee on the Mendocino Indian War to investigate incidents of Indian stealing and killing of settlers’ stock, and alleged atrocities committed by whites against the Indians.[1]

The Joint Special Committee traveled throughout Mendocino County and adjacent locations taking depositions and testimony of prominent settlers in the region. This testimony is part of the official public record, along with the committee’s majority and minority reports about the events.

The Majority Report of the Joint Special Committee

O’Farrell, Dickinson, Maxon and Phelps were authors of the Majority Report. The following are excerpts of the majority’s findings, conclusions, and recommendations.

In Mendocino County…the Indians have committed extensive depredations on the stock of the settlers…The result has been that the citizens, for the purpose of protection to their property, have pursued the tribes supposed to be guilty to their mountain retreats, and in most cases have punished them severely. Repeated stealing and killing of stock, and an occasional murder of a white man, has caused a repetition of the attacks upon the offenders with the same results. The conflict still exists; Indians continue to kill cattle as a means of subsistence, and the settlers in retaliation punish with death. Many of the most respectable citizens of Mendocino County have testified before your committee that they kill Indians, found in what they consider the hostile districts, whenever they lose cattle or horses; nor do they attempt to conceal or deny this fact. Those citizens do not admit, nor does it appear by the evidence, that it is or has been their practice or intention to kill women or children, although some have fallen in the indiscriminate attacks of the Indian rancherias. The testimony shows that in the recent authorized expedition against the Indians in said county, the women and children were taken to the reservations, and also establishes the fact that in the private expeditions this rule was not observed, but that in one instance, an expedition was marked by the most horrid atrocity; but in justice to the citizens of Mendocino County, your committee say that the mass of the settlers look upon such act with the utmost abhorrence…

Accounts are daily coming in from the counties on the Coast Range, of sickening atrocities and wholesale slaughters of great numbers of defenseless Indians in that region of country. Within the last four months, more Indians have been killed by our people than during the century of Spanish and Mexican domination. For an evil of this magnitude, some one is responsible. Either our government, or our citizens, or both, are to blame…

The pre-existing laws and policy of Mexico, as to the status of the Indian, need not have interfered with the views to be taken by our government. Mexico protected the Indian, in her own way, much more effectually than we have done. The very land upon which the aborigines of this State have dwelt, as far back as traditions reach, has been allowed by our government to be occupied by settlers, who thus have the authority of law for a forced occupation of the Indian country. A natural, humane, and proper policy would have protected the Indian in his undeniable rights to the hunting grounds of his forefathers, and would have prevented our border men from entering into a conflict which has cost both lives and property…
 
Your committee do [sic] not think that the wrongs committed upon the Indians of California are chargeable alone to the Federal Government. The evidence appended to this report, disclose facts, from the contemplation of which the mind of peaceful citizens recoil with horror, and prompts the inquiry, if such outrages upon the defenseless are permitted by the proper authorities to go unpunished?

No provocation has been shown, if any could be, to justify such acts. We must admit that the wrong has been the portion of the Indian - the blame with his white brother.

The question resolves itself to this: Shall the Indians be exterminated, or shall they be protected? If the latter, that protection must come from the Federal Government, in the form of adequate appropriations of money and land; and secondly, from this State, by strictly enforcing penal statutes for any infringement upon the rights of Indians. In relation to the recent difficulty between the whites and Indians in Mendocino County, your committee desire to say that no war, or a necessity for a war, has existed, or at the present time does exist. We are unwilling to attempt to dignify, by the term “war” as slaughter of beings, who at least possess human form, and who make no resistance, and make no attacks, either on the person or residence of the citizen.
[2]

The authors of the Majority Report recommended that the California Legislature pass “a law for the better protection of the Indians of California.” [3]

The Minority Report of the Special Joint Committee

Lamar authored the Minority Report and dissented fundamentally from the majority’s view of the events, and their recommendations. Lamar stated, “the testimony will disclose the guilty parties, and from the just indignation of outraged humanity I have no desire to screen them; but for the mass of citizens engaged in this Indian warfare, I claim that they have acted from the strongest motives that govern human action, the defense of life and property.” [4]

Lamar further stated that certain tribes living outside of reservations in the region were “domesticated Indians,” a great number of whom were employed by settlers, receiving “liberal compensation for their labor.” [5] Lamar proposed the following general Indian policy that the State should pursue.

The General Government should first cede to the State of California the entire jurisdiction over Indians and Indian affairs within our borders, and make such donations of land and other property and appropriations of money as would be adequate to make proper provision for the necessities of a proper management.

The State should, then, adopt a general system of peonage or apprenticeship, for the proper disposition and distribution of the Indians by families among responsible citizens. General laws should be passed regulating the relations between the master and servant, and providing for the punishment of any meddlesome interference on the part of third parties. In this manner the whites might be provided with profitable and convenient servants, and the Indians with the best protection and all the necessaries of life in permanent and comfortable homes. [6]

The Mendocino War Reports and the 1860 Amendment to “An Act for the Government and Protection of Indians”

On January 19, 1860, the first version of Assembly Bill No. 65, entitled “An Act amendatory of an Act for the Government and Protection of Indians” was introduced in the California Legislature. [7] Assembly Bill No. 65 proposed broader apprenticeship laws than those contained in the 1850 Act. Various amendments and substitute versions of the bill found in the California State Archives Original Bill File appear to reflect the degree of debate surrounding Indian prisoners of war from expeditions, Lamar’s proposed Indian policies, and more expansive Indian apprenticeship laws. Transcriptions of the proposed versions of of the bill, and the original enrolled version are contained in the Appendix.
 
Appendix. Original Bill Material Pertaining to California Statutes 1860, Chapter 231

This Appendix contains a verbatim transcription of the Original Bill Materials, located in the California State Archives, that are related to the 1860 amendment of the Act for the Government and Protection of Indians passed April 22, 1850. The first document is the initial Assembly Bill No. 65 introduced for consideration on January 19, 1860. The second document is a “substitute” Assembly Bill No. 65, introduced for consideration on February 17, 1860. The third document is the engrossed bill that was enrolled on April 6, 1860.

The first page of each transcribed document in this Appendix contains the legislative history of the bill. This information is handwritten and originally signed by each legislative officer on the front page of the original documents. The language originally contained in the proposed bills, but subsequently deleted from the text during the course of the legislative process is noted in brackets.
 
Assembly Bill No. 65
An act amendatory of an act entitled an act for the Government and Protection of Indians passed April 22, 1850

In Assembly January 19, 1860
Read first & second time
Referred to Com. on Indian Affairs
Weston
Asst Clerk

February 11, 1860, Reported with amendt & passage
Recommended as amended
Weston
Asst Clk

Feb. 13, 1860
Taken from file
& referred to Jud[iciary] Com[mittee]
Weston
Asst Clk

Feb 17, 1860, Substitute reported & recommended
Weston
Asst Clk

Feb 27, 1860: Substituted adopted & ordered printed
Weston
Ass’t Clk
An Act amendatory of an act entitled An Act for the Government and Protection of Indians passed April 22, 1850

The People of the State of California represented in Senate and Assembly do enact as follows:

Section 1st , Section third of said Act is hereby amended so as to read as follows

Section 3d Any person having or hereafter obtaining any Indian child or children male or female from the parents or relations of such child or children [stricken from text: with their] and wishing to domesticate said child or children and any person desiring to obtain any Indian or Indians either children or grown persons that may have been taken prisoner or prisoners [stricken from text: and wishing to domesticate either children or grown persons in any expedit] of war [stricken from text: in any] and wishing to domesticate said Indians, such person shall go before a Justice of the Peace of the County in which such Indians may [stricken from text: be] reside at the time and if the Justice of the Peace becomes satisfied that no compulsory means have been used to obtain the said child or children from its parents or friends or that the said child or children or other Indian or indians of either sex have been taken and are held as a prisoner or prisoners of war, he shall enter on record, in a book kept for that purpose the sex and probable age of the child or children or other indians, and shall give to such
person a certificate authorizing him or her to have the care custody control and earnings of such child or children or other Indians, for and during the following term of years, such children as are under twelve years of age, until they attain the age of twenty five years, such children as are over twelve and under eighteen years of age until they attain the age of thirty years, and such indians as may be over the age of eighteen years, for and
during the term of ten years then next following the date of said certificate, any person or persons [stricken: being] having any indian or indians in his or their possession as such prisoners shall have the preference to domesticate as many of such indians as he or they may desire for their own use, every indian either male or female in the possession or under the control of any person under the provisions of this act shall be taken and deemed to be a minor Indian, [stricken from text: for such]

Sec. 2nd Section seventh of said act is hereby amended so as to read as follows,
 
Sec 7. If any person shall forcibly convey any Indian from any place without this State to any place within this State, or from his or her home within this State, or compel him, or her, to work or perform any services against his or her will,

Except as provided in this act, he or they may be upon conviction fined in any sum not less than fifty dollars, nor more than five hundred dollars, at the discretion of the Court
 Substitute for Assembly Bill No. 65


An act amendatory of an act entitled An Act for the Government & Protection of Indians passed April 22, 1850

Feb 17, 1860. Reported as substitute for Assembly Bill No. 65 & passage recommended
Weston
Ass’t Clk

Feb. 27, 1860, adopted & ordered printed.
Weston
Ass’t Clk

Mch 10, 1860, amended, ___ suspended, considered engrossed read third time and passed
Weston
Asst Clk
Judiciary Committee

An Act amendatory of An Act Entitled “An Act for the Government and Protection of Indians passed April 22 1850

The People of the State of California represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows:

Section 1st Section third of said Act is hereby amended so as to read as follows:

Section 3: County and District Judges in the respective counties of this State shall by virtue of this Act have full power and authority, at the instance and request of any person having or hereafter obtaining any Indian child or children male or female under the age of fifteen years from the parents or person or persons having the care or charge of such child or children with the consent of such parents or person or persons having the care or charge of any such child or children, or at the instance and request of any person desirous of obtaining any indian or Indians whether children or grown persons that may be held as prisoners of war, or at the instance and request of any person desirous of obtaining any vagrant Indian or Indians as have no settled habitation or means of livelihood and have not placed themselves under the protection of any white person, to bind and put out such
Indians as apprentices to trades --- husbandry or other employments as shall to them appear proper, and for this purpose shall execute duplicate Articles of Indenture of Apprenticeship on behalf of such Indians, which Indentures shall also be executed by the person to whom such Indian or Indians are to be indentured: one copy of which shall be filed by the County Judge [stricken from text: with the] in the Recorders Office of the County and one copy retained by the person to whom such Indian or Indians may be indentured; such Indenture shall
authorise [sic] such person to have the care custody control and earnings of such Indian or Indians and shall require such person to clothe and suitably provide the necessaries of life, for such Indian or Indians for and during the term for which such Indian or Indians shall be apprenticed, and shall contain the sex name and
probable age of such Indian or Indians, Such Indentures may be for the following terms of years, such children as are under fourteen years of age, if males until they attain the age of twenty five years; if females until they attain the age of twenty one years; such as are over fourteen and under twenty years of age if males until they attain the age of thirty years; if females until they attain the age of twenty five years; and such Indians as may be over the age of twenty years for and during the term of ten years then next following the date of such Indenture at
the discretion of such Judge. Such Indians as may be indentured under the provisions of this section shall be deemed within such provisions of this act as are applicable to minor Indians

Section 2d Section seventh of said act is hereby amended so as to read as follows,

Section 7 If any person shall forcibly convey any Indian from any place without this State to any place within this State or from his or her home within this State, or compel him or her to work or perform any service against his or her will except as provided in this Act he or they shall upon conviction thereof be fined in any sum not less than one hundred dollars nor more than five hundred dollars before any court having jurisdiction at the discretion of the Court, and the collection of such fine shall be enforced as provided by law in other criminal cases, one half to be paid to the prosecutor and one have [sic] to the County in which such conviction is had
 Substitute for Assembly Bill No. 65
An act amendatory of an act entitled an act for the government & protection of Indians passed April 22, 1850

Feb 17, 1860 reported as substitute for assembly Bill No. 65 & passage recommended
Weston
Asst Clk

Feb 27, 1860, adopted and ordered printed
Weston
Asst. Clk

March 10, 1860 Amended rules suspended, considered
Engrossed read third time and passed
Weston
Asst Clk

E.W. Casey Engrossing Clerk
231 [in pencil]
Judiciary Committee

March 13th 1860
Read first and second times and refd to the Committee on Federal Relations
Williamson
Asst Secty

March 23rd 1860
Reported back and passage recommended & placed on file April 6th
Taken up read a third time & passed
Enrolled April 6th 1860
H.C. Kibbe
Enrolling Clerk
Chap 231 [in pencil]
An Act amendatory of an act Entitled “An Act for the Government and Protection of Indians passed April 22d 1850.

The People of the State of California represented in Senate and Assembly do enact as follows.

Section 1. Section third of said Act, is hereby amended so as to read as follows;

Section 3d. County and District Judges in the respective Counties of the State shall by virtue of this act have full power and authority, at the instance and request of any person having or hereafter obtaining any Indian child or children male or female under the age of fifteen years, from the parents or person or persons having the care or charge of such child or children with the consent of such parents or person or persons having the care or charge of any such child or children, or at the instance and request of any person desirous of obtaining any Indian or Indians, whether children or grown persons that may be held as prisoners of war, or at the instance and request of any person desirous of obtaining any vagrant Indian or Indians as have no settled habitation or means of livelihood, and have not placed themselves under the protection of any white person, to bind and put out such Indians as apprentices to trades husbandry or other employments as shall to them appear proper, and for this purpose shall execute duplicate Articles of Indenture of Apprenticeship on behalf of such Indians, which Indentures shall also be executed by the person to whom such Indian or Indians are to be Indentured; one copy of which shall be filed by the County Judge, in the Recorders office of the County, and one copy retained by the person to whom such Indian or Indians may be Indentured, such Indentures shall authorize such person to have the care custody control and earnings of such Indian or Indians and shall require such person to clothe and suitably provide the necessaries of life for such Indian or Indians, for and during the term for which such Indian or Indians shall be apprenticed, and shall contain the sex name and probable age of such Indian or Indians, such indentures may be for the following terms of years; such children as are under fourteen years of age, if males until they attain the age of twenty five years; if females until they attain the age of twenty one years; such as are over fourteen and under twenty years of age, if males until they attain the age of thirty years; if females until they attain the age of twenty five years, and such Indians as may be over the age of twenty years for and during the term of ten years thru next following the date of such indenture at the discretion of such Judge, such Indians as may be indentured under the provisions of this Section, shall be deemed within such provisions of this Act, as are applicable to minor Indians

Section 2. Section Seventh of said act is hereby amended so as to read as follows:

Section 7. If any person shall forcibly convey any Indian from any place without this State, to any place within this State, or from his or her home within this State, or compel him or her to work or perform any service against his or her will except as provided in this act, he or they shall upon conviction thereof, be fined in any sum, not less than one hundred dollars nor more than five hundred dollars, before any Court having jurisdiction at the discretion of the Court, and the collection of such fine shall be enforced as provided by law in other criminal cases, on half to be paid to the prosecutor, and one half to the County in which such conviction is had.
 
Footnotes
 
[1] The Joint Special Committee was comprised of Jasper O’Farrell (Sonoma, Marin, Mendocino), and W.B. Dickinson (El Dorado), as the Senate Committee. Joseph B. Lamar (Mendocino, Sonoma), William B. Maxon (San Mateo) and Abner Phelps (San Francisco) comprised the House Committee. Don A. Allen, Legislative Sourcebook: The California Legislature and Reapportionment, 1849-1965, (Sacramento: Assembly of the State of California, 1965), 364, 374, 450, 456.
 
[2] “Majority Report of the Special Joint Committee on the Mendocino War,” in Appendix to Journals of the Senate, of the Eleventh Session of the Legislature of the State of California, (Sacramento: C.T. Botts, State Printer, 1860), 4-6.
 
[3] Ibid., 7.

[4] “Minority Report of the Special Joint Committee on the Mendocino War,” in Appendix to Journals of the Senate, of the Eleventh Session of the Legislature of the State of California, (Sacramento: C.T. Botts, State Printer, 1860), 10.
 
[5] Ibid.

62 Ibid.

[7] Journal of the House of Assembly
 
Records of the Mendocino War at the California State Archives, Sacramento
 
 
[ folder: F3753:354 ]
Petition from G.H. Woodman to Governor Milton S. Latham for protection from Indians. Claims they have formed alliance of tribes and locals can no longer afford to protect themselves, requests assembly to authorize raising of 50 men. Written in Long Valley, Mendocino County, undated.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:355 ]
Report from 2nd Lieutenant Edward Dillon to Major E. Johnson, Company Commander, 6th Infantry, Fort Weller, reporting on activities of settlers against Indians in area. Follows closely his deposition on massacres of Indians by settlers. Written in Round Valley, March 23, 1859.
4 pages 7 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:356 ]
A copy of Dillon's report on activities of settlers in Round Valley. Written in Round Valley, March 23, 1859.
9 pages 9 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:357 ]
Deposition by 2nd Lieutenant Edward Dillon, Commander, Detachment of 6th Regiment, Round Valley; stating the abuse and activities committed by the settlers against the Indians on the Round Valley Reservation. Particularly mentions Jarboe. Written in Round Valley, 1859.
8 pages 16 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:358 ]
Letter from Colonel R. Clarke forwarding Lieutenant Dillon's report on conditions in Round Valley to the Governor for his action/information. Written at Headquarters Los Angeles County, April 22, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:359 ]
Copy of Colonel Clarke's letter to Governor Weller enclosing Dillon's report. Written at Headquarters, Los Angeles County, April 24, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:360 ]
A copy (or original) of petition from citizens of Round and Eden Valley to Governor for permission to raise force to fight Indians. (On back there is pencilled note to Major Johnson from J. Tobin asking him to allow a Judge Hastings to use Tobin's saddle, mochos, and blanket.) Written at Robertson's Camp, Eel River, April 24, 1859.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:361 ]
Petition from residents of Round and Eden Valleys complaining to Governor Weller of depredations of Indians in area between No./So. fork of Eel and Round/Eden Valleys. Asks permission to raise 20 volunteers to fight them. Statement attested to by Thomas Henley, Superintendent of Indian Affairs. Written at Robertson's Camp, So. fork Eel River, April 24, 1859.
2 pages 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:362 ]
Letter from Governor Weller to Colonel Clarke asking if his forces in Round and Eden Valleys are sufficient and, if not, can he increase them? Enclosed (missing) is a petition from citizens of Mendocino County. Written at Executive Department, Sacramento, April 29, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:363 ]
Letter from 1st Lieutenant C.C. Churchill to T.C. Hastings in reply to request to specify where all Federal troops are stationed in California. Lieutenant also states he does not know whether anymore would be available for Round and Eden Valleys. Attached is letter from Hastings to Governor Weller stating further depredations in Round Valley and that Feds are against whites. Again requests Governor's aid. Written at Office of Company Commander, Department Cal., San Francisco, April 30, 1859.
2 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:364 ]
Copy of Lieutenant Churchill's letter to Hastings. Written at Office of Commander, Department Cal., San Francisco, April 30.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:365 ]
Original letter from Hastings to Governor Weller concerning assistance to Round Valley and that no U.S. troops available. Written in San Francisco, April 30, 1850.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:366 ]
Original letter from Hastings to Governor Weller stating further depredations at Round Valley and Federal troops against whites. Written in San Francisco, May 4, 1859.
2 pages 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:367 ]
Letter from T.C. Hastings to Governor Weller saying Colonel Clarke is in Los Angeles fighting Mojaves but Lieutenant in Adjutant General's Office stated that no troops will be available to fight Indians in Mendocino County Tells Governor to send gentlemen by night boat to him and he will get arms for him to take to Round Valley area for use by volunteers that should be raised there. Written in San Francisco, April 30, 1859.
2 pages 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:368 ]
Letter from Colonel Clarke to Governor Weller stating he had forwarded Dillon's report and had waited to hear from him (Governor) concerning it before answering Letter of 29th. Stated no white killed as far as U.S. troops can ascertain, so protection is enough. No reason to send more at this time. Written at Headquarters, Department of Cal., San Francisco, May 13, 1859.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:369 ]
Copy of petition from citizens of Nome Cult to Governor Weller asking permission to raise volunteer company to fight Indians and complaining about U.S. Army officers won't help against Indians. Written at Nome Cult, June 10, 1859.
3 pages 6 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:370 ]
Petition from citizens of Nome Cult Valley asking permission to raise company of volunteers to take care of Indian situation. States that petition of citizens of Round Valley area was true despite memorial to the contrary from others. Written at Nome Cult Valley, June 10, 1859.
5 pages 5 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:371 ]
Report of meeting of citizens of Eden Valley wherein they elect W.L. Jarboe, Captain of volunteers, they are raising to fight Uke (sic) Indians. Forwarded to Governor Weller. Written in Eden Valley, July 11, 1859.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:372 ]
Copy of original report of meeting to elect Jarboe. Written in Eden Valley, July 11, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:373 ]
Letter from Brigadier General Wm. Kibbe, Adjutant General, to Governor John B. Weller reporting that the 2000 to 5000 Indians in area of Round Valley are killing cattle and horses and lone men. He has ordered 20 men and a Captain into field as U.S. Army troops won't protect citizens. Written in Red Bluff, July 25, 1859.
3 pages 4 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:374 ]
Report from Brigadier General Wm. Kibbe, Adjutant General, to Governor Weller concerning Indian troubles in Tehema and Mendocino Counties. Complains of U.S. troops at Round Valley - says got some cooperation from those at Camp Craft, near Red Bluff, Written at Headquarters, California Militia, Sacramento, July 30, 1859.
4 pages 6 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:375 ]
Extract from Grand Jury Report, Mendocino County requesting State Legislature or General Government do something to effect some speedy and efficient remedy to this rapidly increasing evil. The evil is what to do with the Indians in country. Written in Mendocino County, August, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:376 ]
Another copy of extract of Grand Jury Report asking relief from Indian problem. Written in Mendocino County, August, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:377 ]
Letter from Jarboe to Major Johnson, Company Commander, 6th Infantry inviting him to go along on foray where he will be shown proof Indians stole beef and where large band live who are going to kill all whites. Notes in letter that he got verbal reply he (Jarboe) wasn't worth noticing and that Indians would kill him. Written in Round Valley, August 13, 1859.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:378 ]
Report from Major Edward Johnson to Major W.W. Mackall, Assistant Adjutant General, Headquarters, Department of Cal., San Francisco on trip to Eden and Round Valleys. Said little evidence of settlers claims of depredations and Jarboe is out with his force in war of extermination. Claims he (Johnson) can do nothing. Copy of report attached. Written at Fort Weller, August 21, 1859.
6 pages 6 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:379 ]
Letter from Wm. Robertson to Judge telling of stock losses in Eden Valley and plans to move all to Hildreth Ranch. Asks for Judge's wishes as soon as possible. Written at Eel River, August 26, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:380 ]
Report from Captain John Adams, Company Commander, 1st Dragoons, to Major W.W. Mackall, Assistant Adjutant General, stating a party of whites, illegally organized had attacked and killed Indians camped at a Mr. Roff's Ranch and thereby probably provoked an Indian war in area of Pitt River. Asked information be passed to Governor and Superintendent of Indian Affairs. Written at Fort Crook, September 3, 1859.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:381 ]
Authorization from Governor Weller to Jarboe to raise company of 20 volunteers to protect citizens of Mendocino County and to procure supplies. Written at Executive Department, Sacramento, September 6, 1859.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:382 ]
Further order from Governor Weller to Jarboe cautioning him to only chastise guilty Indians as there are only small number of guilty. Don't hurt women and children. Written at Executive Department, Sacramento, September 8, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:383 ]
Report from Jarboe to Governor Weller acknowledging his commission and reporting names of men plus activities for period from July to September and Indians killed. Written in Eden Valley, September 16, 1859.
3 pages 4 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:384 ]
Copy of Jarboe's report to Weller. Written in Eden Valley, September 16, 1859.
5 pages 5 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:385 ]
Letter from Jarboe to Governor John B. Weller stating he has enrolled 20 men into service of state and further that if he were allowed 40 men he could take every hostile Indian out of state mountains. Written in Eden Valley, September 16, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:386 ]
Petition from citizens of Long Valley to Governor Weller to increase size of Jarboe's force so he can extend protection to them. Written in Long Valley, September 28, 1859.
2 pages 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:387 ]
Copy of petition from citizens of Long Valley to Governor Weller. Written in Long Valley, September 28, 1859.
2 pages 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:388 ]
Report from Jarboe to Governor Weller describing an action against Indians resulting in 25 killed and 20 prisoners. Says he got petition from Long Valley residents asking protection but can't provide unless gets 20 more men. Written at Elk Creek, October 1, 1859.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:389 ]
Letter from Wm. Henry, Mendocino County Judge, to Governor Weller asking for more men for Jarboe so he can protect Long Valley and rest of county as well as area around Round and Eden Valleys and Eel River. Enclosed Grand Jury's August report. Written at Ukiah, October 4, 1859.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:390 ]
Letter from S.C. Hastings to Governor Weller stating he lost a petition and a statement from Judge Henry, Mendocino, asking for help against 8 to 12 thousand Indians in Mendocino County. Says Jarboe needs more men. Written at Cloverdale, October 6, 1859.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:391 ]
Letter from J.B. Lamor to Governor Weller saying an organized force needs to be kept on Indians track to protect Long Valley citizens. Also says Jarboe should be man to lead them. Written at Ukiah, October 6, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:392 ]
Letter from Jarboe to Hastings telling of plans to attack a rancheria containing 500 Indians believed to have taken 200 horses from Waldman. Says will have to build winter quarters soon. Written at Round Valley, October 7, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:393 ]
Original of letter from Jarboe to Lieutenant Dillon asking for cooperation against Indians. Written at Round Valley, October 8, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:394 ]
Letter from Jarboe to Lieutenant Dillon asking for help against Indians near the forks of river who killed John Bland and stole 200 horses from Long Valley. Written at Round Valley, October 8, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:395 ]
Original of letter from Lieutenant Dillon to Jarboe declining to cooperate against Indians. Written at Round Valley, October 8, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:396 ]
Letter from Lieutenant Dillon to Jarboe stating he has no proof of Bland's death or 200 head of stock being missing. Declines cooperation. Written at Round Valley, October 8, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:397 ]
Copy of letter from Lieutenant Dillon to Jarboe declining to cooperate against Indians. Written at Round Valley, October 8, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:398 ]
Report from Jarboe to Governor Weller claiming to have found remains of John Bland, who Jarboe says Indians burned at stake. Describes night action in which 11 killed 33 captured but stated could only retain 14 from escaping. Complained Lieutenant Dillon would not help him. Written at Eden Valley, October 16, 1859.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:399 ]
Letter from Governor Weller to Jarboe reiterating previous instructions to act against the bad Indians only and not wage war of extermination. Jarboe is to assume defensive and protect lives and property. Says doesn't believe whole tribe of Indians in arms. Says turn POWS over to civil authorities if guilty of Bland's murder. Written in Sacramento, October 23, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:400 ]
Report from Jarboe to Governor Weller reporting two engagements with nine killed and 100 prisoners taken, of which 90 remained. Claimed he found part of cow belonging to Masten Cabot, Round Valley. Discharged one Wm. Daly for imprudent conduct with squaw. Written at Robertson's Ranch, October 28, 1859.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:401 ]
Report from Jarboe to Weller outlining activities of command for November and attacks with deaths and prisoners totalled. Claims to be following Weller's orders to only punish guilty Indians and complains again about Lieutenant Dillon. Written at Headquarters, Eel River Rangers, December 3, 1859.
4 pages 7 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:402 ]
Copy of Jarboe's report to Weller. Written at Headquarters, Eel River Rangers, December 3, 1859.
6 pages 6 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:403 ]
Letter from Jarboe to Weller saying Weller's last letter was stolen and opened and not received. Goes on to reassure Governor what great good Jarboe doing and how he will change procedures if required. Written at Headquarters, Eel River Rangers, December 5, 1859.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:404 ]
Copy of Jarboe's letter to Weller. Written at Headquarters, Eel River Rangers, December 5, 1859.
3 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:405 ]
Report from Jarboe to Governor Weller claimed Indians still committing depredations. Relates battle where Indians refuse to quit, all killed. Reports Henley complained that Indians from Eel River had stolen his cattle but Jarboe thinks they were Reservation Indians. Reports wounding of Lieutenant Pool by arrow. Written at Headquarters, Eel River Rangers, December 20, 1859.
5 pages 8 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:406 ]
Letter from Jarboe to Lieutenant Dillon stating his men had taken a group of Round Valley Indians prisoner instead of killing them after one presented a Lieutenant Wood with a pass signed by Dillon. Warn Dillon to keep Indians at home or else. Written at Headquarters, Eel River Rangers, December 21, 1859.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:407 ]
Petition from citizens of Round Valley to Governor Weller for removal of Jarboe as Company Commander of Eel River Rangers for incompetency. Signed by T. B. Henley, among others. Written at Round Valley, undated.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:408 ]
Petition from Company officers to Governor Weller asking protections against Indians in north half of county now that Jarboe had driven them from Round and Eden Valleys. Asks for more men for Jarboe. Written at Mendocino County, undated.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:409 ]
Letter from Governor Weller to Jarboe telling him to disband his volunteer company as job is done. Thanks him constrainedly. Written in Sacramento, January 3, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:410 ]
Letter from G.W. Tiffuss to Brigadier General Kibbe, Adjutant General, asking payment for treating a volunteer from Jarboe's company wounded in thigh by arrow in skirmish. Wants Kibbe to handle matter for him. Written in Nome Cult Indian Farm, January 11, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:411 ]
Letter from J.B. Lamar to Governor Milton T. Latham introducing a G.H. Woodman who wishes to discuss Indian hostiles in his home area. Written in Sacramento, January 12, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:412 ]
Letter from Lieutenant Dillon to Major W.W. Mackall, Assistant Adjutant General, Headquarters, Department of Pacific, stating he doesn't want to leave Round Valley while settlers are allowed to continue to harass Indians. Says why no investigation of trespass and damage of government property. Indian women are taken by force frequently. Written in Round Valley, January 14, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:413 ]
Petition by citizens of Ukiah to Governor to allow Jarboe to reactivate his volunteer force and to provide protection from hostile Indians. Written in Ukiah, January 15, 1860.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:414 ]
Petition to Governor Latham and citizens of Mendocino County from Eel River Rangers for removal of Jarboe as Captain and permission to elect new leader. Written at Headquarters, Eel River Rangers, January 15, 1860.
6 pages 6 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:415 ]
Letter from Governor Downey to Colonel Clarke, Company Commander, Pacific Department asking for troops for Round Valley and Mendocino County in general. Written in Sacramento, January 18, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:416 ]
Letter from Colonel Clarke to Governor Downey in reply to request for troops to Round Valley. States has troops there, no trouble reported, will ask for a report and will then let Governor know intentions. Written at Headquarters, Department of Cal., San Francisco, January 20, 1860.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:417 ]
Affadavit of S.P. Storms, Round Valley, that Indians had been and continued to kill stock in and around Round Valley, Claimed 15 men also killed. Said things worse since U.S. Army come; Lieutenant Dillon wanted Indians to kill whites. Written in Sacramento, January 20, 1860.
3 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:418 ]
Letter of transmittal from Governor Downey to Assembly with letter to General Clarke, U.S. Army, Company Commander, Pacific Department, and his reply. Downey recommends sending help to Mendocino County without waiting for Feds. Written in Sacramento, January 21, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:419 ]
Affadavit of J.B. Owens, Mendocino County, that Indians in Round, Long, Eden Valleys had killed over 1000 head of stock, 15 men. Said U.S. Army and its officers encouraged Indians in this behavior. Written in Sacramento, January 23, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:420 ]
Petition from Eel River Rangers to Governor Downey to return a document evidently condemning Captain Jarboe (Round Valley). Say they did it in excitement and Jarboe did best he could. Written in Ukiah, January 23, 1860.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:421 ]
Petition to Governor-Latham asking for return of first petition requesting removal of Jarboe as Company Commander. Said they signed original in moment of greatest possible excitement and were misinformed. Written in Ukiah, January 25, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:422 ]
Report from Jarboe to Brigadier General Kibbe, Adjutant General, to effect he has disbanded company and listing supplies and equipment he has on hand belonging to state. Written at Headquarters, Eel River Rangers, January 27, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:423 ]
Letter (report) from Lieutenant Dillon, Company Commander, Round Valley to Major W.W. Mackall, Assistant Adjutant General, Department of Pacific, San Francisco, in response to request from Governor of California for information on Indian Affairs in Round Valley. Says Indians innocent of stock killing or murder. Whites are out to exterminate Indians and pre-empt land. Written in Round Valley, January 27, 1860.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:424 ]
Letter from Brigadier General A. Clarke, Commander, Department of Pacific, to Governor Downey enclosing private letter from Lieutenant Dillon to his commanding officer. Clarke states the letter should relieve Governor's fears for safety of citizens. Written at Headquarters, Department of Pacific, San Francisco, February 1, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:425 ]
Letter from Fred P. Greene to Brigadier General Kibbe, enclosing bill's for food and hauling. Comments when Legislature gets around to paying bills plus that for transporting Indians to the Nogo that the money will be welcome. Written in San Francisco, January 31, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:426 ]
Letter from Colonel (Brevet General) Clarke, Commander, Cal. Department, to Governor Downey enclosing report on Indian conditions in Round Valley. Mentions letter from G.H. Woodman, Long Valley, on Indians being driven by Jarboe from Round Valley to Long Valley. Asks for information. Written at Headquarters, Department of Cal., San Francisco, February 3, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:427 ]
Letter from Brigadier General Wm. Kibbe, Adjutant General, to George Henley authorizing him to receipt for and keep for the state all property now in possession of Jarboe, former Captain Eel River Rangers. Written in Sacramento, February 9, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:428 ]
Petition from citizens of Long Valley to Governor Downey for protection from wild Indians. Claim they have lost 400 head of stock, 3 men since previous September and over $4000 worth of stock since January 15, 1860. Written in Long Valley, Mendocino County, February 13, 1860.
3 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:429 ]
Letter from Colonel (General) Clarke to Governor Downey correcting printed correspondence relative to Indian Affairs in Mendocino County as to Major Johnson's statement concerning 11 Indians killed on Eel River by party headed by Colonel Thomas J. Henley. Written at Headquarters, Department of Cal., San Francisco, February 14, 1860.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:430 ]
Testimony before a committee of inquiry by James Tobin, Alonzo Kinsley on Indian-white relations in Round Valley and in U.S. Army - civilian relations there. Mostly pro-settler, anti Indian. Some criticism of cut in sustenance money. Written in San Francisco, February 15, 1860.
7 pages 12 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:431 ]
Letter from J.H. Woodman to Governor Downey asking aid against Indians in Long Valley. Wants Jarboe to lead volunteers - estimates will need 10-15 thousand (sic) to operate. Written in Long Valley, February 16, 1860.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:432 ]
Letter from Jarboe, former Volunteer Company Commander of militia to Governor John Downey. Jarboe tells of orders from former Governor Weller to muster troops to fight Indians between No. and So. forks of Eel River and Long and Eden Valleys. Outlines claims of kills and asks to be paid. Written in Sacramento, February 18, 1860.
1 long sheet glued together 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:433 ]
Deposition of Wm. Robertson before special committee of Indian Affairs that Indians had killed lots of cattle and horses be managed for Judge Hastings. Said was member of Jarboe's company but spent time running company, never attacked Indians or killed any. Saw prisoners. Never heard of anyone taking children and selling them. Never saw anything. Written in Ukiah, February 21, 1860.
3 pages 6 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:434 ]
Deposition of C.H. Eberle before J.B. Lamar, Chairman, Special Commitee for Indian Affairs, concerning activities at Round Valley involving Indians, U.S. Army troops, and organization of Captain Jarboe's company. Written in Ukiah, February 22, 1860.
3 pages 5 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:435 ]
Deposition of H.L. Ford, Sub Agent, Mendocino Reservation, before investigation committee on Indian Affairs. Said his place has 2700 Indians of whom over 1000 brought in by Kibbe and Jarboe during past few months. Says can take care of Indians always. Says some stock losses have occurred. Allows few Indians to hunt, use weapons they brought. Written in Ukiah, February 22.
3 pages 5 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:436 ]
Wm. Frazier deposes before investigation committee on Indian Affairs to effect he and others from Long Valley had gone on forays against rancherias and killed men, women, and children indiscriminately. Few prisoners were women - claims Indians had plenty to eat but lived on beef and horse meat. Admits killing women on several occasions. Says few children because they are caught and sold. Written in Ukiah, February 22, 1860.
3 pages 6 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:437 ]
Letter from A. Phelps to Governor J.G. Downey telling him of petition coming from Long Valley citizens. Phelps, head of a Committee from Sacramento, says many who signed petition aren't residents of Long Valley, asks Governor to hold action in abeyance until committee's return. Written in Ukiah, Mendocino County, February 23, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:438 ]
Deposition of H.H. Backley before California Senate Committee concerning Jarboe's company and original financial backing by Hastings and George Henley before Jarboe got his commission from Governor. Written in Ukiah, February 23, 1860.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:439 ]
Petition by citizens of Yagers Creek and Van Dousens (sic) Fork to Governor Downey to call to active service the Humboldt Cavalry Company of volunteers to protect citizens from Indians. Written in Hyatsville, Humboldt County, February 23, 1860.
3 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:440 ]
Deposition of B. Newman to Chairman of Indian Affairs Committee concerning letter of authorization for purchase from Hastings and Henley to his firm, Kaskel Mears and Company, which allowed Jarboe to buy supplies for his company. Claims he never saw it but heard of it from partners and or clerk. Written in Ukiah, February 23, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:441 ]
Deposition of Dryden Lacock to Select Committee on Indian Affairs, Chairman J.B.L. Lamas, on activities of Indians in Round and Eden Valleys. Also describes organization of Jarboe's Eel River Rangers by Hastings and George Henley. Written at Storm's Hotel, Round Valley, February 25, 1860.
3 pages 6 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:442 ]
Deposition of James M. Wilsey to Special Committee on Indian Affairs, J.B. Lamar, Chairman, regarding Indians in Round Valley and character and action of Bland. Talks about Indian woman taken from Bland's house by U.S. Army troops under Major Johnson. Written at Storm's Hotel, Round Valley, February 25, 1860.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:443 ]
Deposition of Wm. I. Hildreth before investigation committee on Indian Affairs to effect he had lost stock, mostly horses, to Indians locally but after killing 18, stealing closed. Also served with Jarboe who was most kind to Indian prisoners. Refers to Indian rations at Round Valley as did reservation - six ears of corn or five to six potatoes for days work. Written at So. Fork Eel River, February 25, 1860.
3 pages 6 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:444 ]
Deposition of J.B. Owens before investigation committee on Indian Affairs to effect he helped drive some Judge Hastings cattle to Hildreth's Rancho and enroute a mare was wounded (by Indians presumably). He and three others attacked a rancheria next day but Indians got away free. Claims three horse carcasses, one beef and dried meat in camp. Written at So. Fork Eel River, February 25, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:445 ]
Deposition of Thos. B. Henley to committee investigating conditions at Round Valley to the effect he had lost stock, on one occasion had entered a rancheria with four companions and killed 5 or 6 Indians and later six more they met but also that the settlers needed protection from the Indians. Written at Round Valley, February 26, 1860.
3 pages 5 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:446 ]
Deposition of Jeremiah Lambert before investigating committee on Indian Affairs in Round Valley area. Says he lost nine horses, thinks Indians took them. Says he belongs to Long Valley Volunteers Company and has found meat in Indian camps, helped kill Indians. Says settlers need protection. Written in Round Valley, February 26, 1860.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:447 ]
First deposition of S.P. Storms before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to Round Valley 1856; wished for T.J. Henley, Indian Agent operating Nome Cult farm. Says Indians always stole cattle - should have been given entire valley for support - now hungry. Estimates 500 Indians killed but that whites need protection. Written in Round Valley, February 26, 1860.
4 pages 7 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:448 ]
Deposition of Jackson Farley before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect that he and other settlers in Long Valley have lost horses and cattle. He claims $3000 worth. Says he is Captain of volunteer company who go out to punish stock thefts and have killed between 150-200 Indians and taken 22 prisoners. Says the settlers need protection. Written at Round Valley, February 26, 1860.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:443 ]
Deposition of H.G. Hall before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect that Indians had stolen and killed many horses and cattle belonging to him, Hastings and Henley. Hall was on all early forays vs. Indians and admitted killing women. Was with Jarboe who wasn't cruel to prisoners. States residents of Eden Valley need protection from Indians. Written at Round Valley, February 26, 1860.
6 pages 11 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:450 ]
Part of affadavit on Indians killing cattle in Bald Hills - related to affadavits before special Indian commission of California legislature. Written in Humboldt County, undated.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:451 ]
Deposition of Lieutenant Dillon, Company Commander, Round Valley Detachment, to J.B. Lamar, Chairman, Special Committee to Investigate Indian Affairs, concerning activities in Round Valley. Denies Indians hostile or committing depredations says settlers plotting to make it look like it. Names Henley and then crosses name out. Some testimony on Bland seems missing. Written at Storm's, Rancho, Round Valley, February 27, 1860.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:452 ]
Deposition of Chas. H. Bourne before investigating committee on Indian Affairs who stated Indians killed stock - would start anew now that Jarboe's company disbanded. U.S. Army troops ok but nuisances and no help, officers bad. Need protection from Indians. Written in Round Valley, February 27, 1860.
2 pages 4 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:453 ]
Deposition of George E. White before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect that Indians keep stealing stock, settlers need protection and U.S. Army is hostile to settlers and pro-Indian. Claims losses in Round and Eden Valleys are between $100-$150 million. Written in Round Valley, February 27, 1860.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:454 ]
Deposition of S.L. Davis before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect Indian's steal stock. Does say much stock lost to wild animals. Says U.S. Army no help - need protection from Indians thru own resources. Written in Round Valley, February 27, 1860.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:455 ]
Deposition of George Rees, overseer Nome Cult, before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect that little or no stock stealing, no need for more forces than U.S. Army there, whites causing trouble. Women stealing occurred, from locked building and also of young men with useable skills. Wouldn't return. George Henley, Wilsey's, Storm's, Taycock offenders. Whites tear up fences, have driven off stock. Written in Round Valley, February 27, 1860.
3 pages 6 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:456 ]
Deposition of John Lawson before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect he had lived there since 1856 and when he lost stock he went after Indians killed three, hung five. Participated in several of these forays against Indians always resulting in a killing. Claims if Government will pay him for stock losses, he will leave Valley. Thinks U.S. Army could handle protection. Written in Round Valley, February 27, 1860.
2 pages 4 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:457 ]
Deposition of Martin Corbett before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect that some stock missing or killed. He and others killed Indians in punishment thereof. No need of U.S. Army - no help. Tove arrogant - says Indians tear fences down - settlers have to go five miles extra to get to mills. Written in Round Valley, February 27, 1860.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:458 ]
Letter from Battalion Brigadier General A.S. Clarke, Company Commander, Department of Pacific, to Governor John G. Downey politely refusing to furnish government and legislature with copy of report of one Captain Flint. Says such reports are confidential and Clarke must use discretion about making public. Written at Headquarters, Department of Cal., San Francisco, February 27, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:459 ]
Deposition of George W. Henley before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect he had lost stock to Indians, had helped chastise them, had sold out Round Valley interests thru fear of Indian depredations. Claimed supplied Jarboe's company because no one else would. Says U.S. Army are bad. Says Bland good, never did any harm. Says Rees tried to steal his Indian bay. Written in Round Valley, February 27, 1860.
4 pages 7 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:460 ]
Deposition of Wm. Pollard before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect that he has no first hand knowledge of Indians killing stock. Never killed his. Lots of stock dies in winter, Indian eat, use hide, horns, head - used as evidence Indians steal beef. Says Indians may react if whites keep killing unjustifiably. Written in Round Valley, February 27, 1860.
2 pages 4 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:461 ]
Further deposition of S.P. Storms before committee investigating Indian Affairs to effect that he owned five or six Indians and had fed and clothed them but that Agent Geiger and Lieutenant Dillon had tried to make Indians go to reservation which they didn't wish to do. Said he told Dillon he would resist his taking Indians by force if necessary. Deposition by Baurne and Laycock back Storm's. Written in Round Valley, February 28, 1860.
2 pages 4 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:462 ]
Deposition of Lawrence Battailes, reservation employee to investigating committee on Indian Affairs. Swears Indians don't steal stock in Round Valley but eat dead cattle that died from natural causes. Says whites have killed 300-400 Indians since 1858, no white hurt. Some Indians taken as servants - saw none sold. Written in Round Valley, February 28, 1860.
4 pages 8 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:463 ]
Deposition of Chesley Vaughn before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect that he had been on several Indian hunting expeditions with Jarboe and before - has seen a few dead Indians - never women or children. Knows no one who killed women, maybe one or two squaws. Says Jarboe very kind to prisoners. Written in Round Valley, February 28, 1860.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:464 ]
Deposition of Chas. Baurne before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect John Bland, later killed presumably by Indians, was quiet, peaceable man. Had taken Indian guide who returned alone, said Bland was with two others. Baurne says only heard of one woman killed, that by accident. Written in Round Valley, February 28, 1860.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:465 ]
Deposition of Chas. McLane before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect Indians kill stock, settlers need protection. He had been on several Indian hunts, only saw women killed once, by accident. Said John Bland was arrested by Major Johnson for whipping Indian who stole women from his house where Bland kept her for two months. Written in Round Valley, February 28, 1860.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:466 ]
Deposition of Dr. George W. Jeffriss, physician at Nome Cult Indian Farm before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect he thinks most trespasses are by whites not Indians. Says whites hunt Indians down attributes natural losses to them. Says U.S. Army does best can, whites tear down fences, steal women who are locked up, kill without provocation. Written at Nome Cult Indian Farm, February 28, 1860.
4 pages 7 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:467 ]
Deposition of Isaac W. Shannon before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect only had lost one or two to reservation. Indians liked Colonel Henley for remuner and Henley said to get satisfaction from Indians. Not afraid to travel alone in mountains, most claims exaggerated. Tells of drunken party trying to take his Indians on January 1, 1859. Hard man but better than most in Round Valley. Written at Nome Cult Indian Farm, February 28, 1860.
2 pages 4 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:468 ]
Deposition of Benjamin Arthur before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect that Indians always stole stock in winter and settlers always killed Indians in winter. Casually mentions 300 Indians dying of exposure when moved thru snow to reservation in 1856-57. Says Jarboe killed 300 and took 500 POWS. Relates shooting wounded bay and killing him as he lay on ground helpless. Written at Nome Cult Indian Farm, February 28, 1860.
3 pages 5 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:469 ]
Deposition of John W. Burgess, farmer, Nome Cult Indian Farm before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect Indians try to maintain place, is safe in mountains. Whites harass farm - rip fences, turn in stock. Raise vegetables, feed workers best. Soldiers ok. Says Rees much better than Storms was. Written at Nome Cult Indian Farm, February 28, 1860.
4 pages 7 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:470 ]
Deposition of men who chased Indians after claiming to have found remains of a cow. Attacked rancheria and killed two, wounded three (one woman), captured child. Deposition forwarded to Commission on Mendocino War. Written in Eden Valley, February 29, 1860.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:471 ]
Deposition of W.T. Scott, stockman Round Valley, to Wm. Claxson, Member, Assembly Commission on Indian Affairs, concerning reasons for Indian actions in Round Valley. Strong indictment of Hastings, Jarboe, et al, on reasons for Indian war and their dealings with California government. Written in Cloverdale, Sonoma County, March 2, 1860.
10 pages 10 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:472 ]
Deposition of George J. Clarke, Purser, Steamer Petaluma before A. Phelps, Member investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect he had been hunting near Round Valley, came upon Jarboe's camp. Saw prisoners well fed, kindly treated. Jarboe fired man who had intercourse with POW woman. Refused to sell children. Written on Steamer Petaluma, March 5, 1860.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:473 ]
Deposition, of T.D. Felt to effect that he has lost about 60 head of cattle in last 18 months in Bald Hill country to Indians. Is moving rest out. Written at Eel River, March 8, 1860.
2 pages 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:474 ]
Affadavit of John Cooper concerning difficulties with Indians in area and request for help. Claims two brothers killed and himself shot in hand by arrow plus raid on mill. Written at Cooper's Mill, Eel River, March 9, 1860.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:475 ]
Petition from citizens of Union to Governor John G. Downey, asking him to raise a force sufficient to remove all Indians from Humboldt and Trinity Counties. Do so in name of humanity to prevent another massacre of Indians and a war of extermination. Indians interfere with trade to and from mines. Written at Union, Humboldt County, March 9, 1860.
4 pages 4 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:476 ]
Deposition of A.P. Compton to effect that he has run cattle in Bald Hills since 1858. Says Indians gradually become bolder, started killing cattle for meat. He was on several volunteer expeditions in pursuit of Indians - claimed they discovered several camps with large amounts of beef bones in them. Written at Eel River, March 9, 1860.
5 pages 5 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:477 ]
Deposition of James Tewksbury to effect that he had two oxen taken and the valley Indians gave him a pair of mockisins (sic) made from the hide. He told Indians if they didn't bring in killer he would kill all of them. They brought him a hand, claimed it came from killer. Written at Eel River, March 10, 1860.
2 pages 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:478 ]
Deposition of A.S. Pardee to effect that Indians burned his house in 1858. He rebuilt on same site. Now some Indians took shot at him from ambush; has moved family again. Can't keep guards, too expensive, house will go again. Written in Union, Humboldt County, March 10, 1860.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:479 ]
Deposition of David H. Snyder to effect that he had been shot at recently by Indians and a cabin broken into and guns and ammunition stolen. Claims Indians intend to drive all whites out of area. Written in Humboldt County, March 10, 1860.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:480 ]
Deposition of Thos. H. Dix concerning cattle killing by Indians. Only last page - rest missing. Written in Humboldt County, March 10, 1860.
1/2 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:481 ]
Letter from Humboldt County Sheriff B. VanNest to Governor Downey, conveying the depositions of citizens concerning Indian depredations. VanNest indicates Governor needed and or requested reasons to call local volunteer company into service, VanNest attempts to furnish same. Says U.S. Army is no help - doesn't think his local people will commit excesses. Written in Eureka, March 10, 1860.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:482 ]
Paper entitled Memorandum of Additional Accounts on State Controller letterhead. Amounts range from.50¢ to $1350.50. Since F.P. Greene is listed these probably are accounts due on charges accrued during Indian wars. Written in Sacramento, March 12, 1860.
2 pages 3 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:483 ]
Letter from George Woodman to Brigadier General Kibbe he had met P. V. Middlesworth who requested he write Kibbe and tell him that Middlesworth had presented a bill of $77.00 for 1100 lbs. of flour furnished to volunteers and for Indian POW's but understood Kibbe hadn't gotten it. Wanted money. Written in Shasta, March 12, 1860.
1 page 2 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:484 ]
Deposition of T.C. Hastings before investigating committee on Indian Affairs to effect that he owned Eden Valley; had hired H.L. Hale to herd his stock there after Colonel T. Henley, Indian Superintendent, had recommended Eden Valley. Said Indians killed much stock, he knew nothing about any Indian killings, had fired Hale, asked for U.S. Army help - now rec. that Governor commissioned Jarboe and go. Written in Sacramento, March 13, 1860.
4 pages 8 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:485 ]
Letter from Jarboe to Governor Downey telling him he can't appear before the Board of Examiners for Mendocino War Bill Certification for some time. Asks Downey to halt Board action until he arrives and can see the books. Written in San Francisco, April 16, 1860.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:486 ]
Letter from Hastings to Governor Downey with depositions of Mr. Wm. Pool concerning Hastings' losses to Indian raids. Asks Governor Downey to forward to committee considering Mendocino war claims. Written in Benicia, February 2, 1861.
1 page 1 side
 
 
[ folder: F3753:487 ]
Petition from citizens of Long Valley asking Governor Downey for immediate protection from Indian stock raiding. Want either state or Federal troops or say most will move. Written in Long Valley, Mendocino County, March 10, 1861.
6 pages 6 sides
 
 
[ folder: F3753:488 ]
Letter from Brigadier General Wm Kibbe to George Henley asking what happened to stores he was authorized to pick up from Jarboe in February 1860 and why no report? Written in Sacramento, June 4, 1862.
1 page 1 side
 
 


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