Historic California Posts, Camps, Stations and Airfields
Fort Barry
 
 
Fort Barry circa 1918. Photo courtesy National Park Service
 
 
 
Fort Barry
by Mr. Gordon Chappell, Regional Historian, Pacific West Region, National Park Service
 
At the end of the 19th Century, when modem artillery of greatly increased range and calibers came into use, the line of defenses that protected San Francisco Bay shifted westward to a line stretching from Point Bonita to Point Lobos. North of the Golden Gate at Point Bonita, this would require a whole new series of gun emplacements on the Marin Headlands. It would represent an attempt to match the size and range of the heaviest guns that could be carried on an enemy warship, and by locating batteries on the westernmost points of land north and south of the strait and west of San Francisco Bay, keep enemy warships beyond a range from which they could shell the city and its harbor.
 
But it was not until after the beginning of the 20th Century that, spurred by the recent Spanish-American War of 1898, army engineers actually began construction of large gun emplacements north of the Golden Gate at new locations to the west, toward the ocean. This land was technically the western end of Fort Baker, which in 1897 had replaced the Lime Point Military Reservation of 1850, but it was known unofficially at first as the Point Bonita Military Reservation. Here, the Corps of Engineers constructed, more or less concurrently, five batteries:
 

BATTERY MENDELL - First of the batteries to be built in Fort Barry, it was commenced in July 1901 and mounted two 12-inch breech-loading rifles, Model 1895, on Buffington-Crozier "disappearing" carriages Model 1897. Colonel George Mendell, the engineer officer who had supervised construction of post-Civil War and early Endicott-type batteries around San Francisco Bay, had died in San Francisco in 1902, and on November 22, 1902, the new Marin County battery was named for him.

BATTERY ALEXANDER - Commenced in October 1901, this eight-mortar battery, smallest mortar battery in the defenses of San Francisco, was armed with breech-loading 12-inch mortars, all Model 1890 mounted on model 1896 Mark I carriages. The battery was named on November 22, 1902 in honor of Colonel Barton S. Alexander of the Corps of Engineers, an associate of Colonel Mendell's and the senior engineer on the Pacific Coast, who had died in 1878.

BATTERY EDWIN GUTHRIE - This battery of four six-inch rapid-fire guns, Model 1900, mounted on barbette carriages, Model 1900. The emplacement was named on December 27, 1904 in honor of Captain Edwin Guthrie, 15th Infantry, who died in the Mexican War in 1847.

BATTERY SAMUEL RATHBONE - The second six inch barbette battery, this one contained Model 1900 weapons, on Model 1900 barbette carriages. The battery was named on December 27, 1904 in honor of a lieutenant of artillery killed in action in Canada in the War of 1812.

BATTERY PATRICK O'RORKE - It was built to mount four 15-pounder, 3 inch guns on Model 1903 pedestal mounts. It was not armed until 1909. The battery was nevertheless named on December 27, 1904 in honor of Colonel Patrick Henry O'Rorke, killed at Gettysburg during the Civil War in July 1863.

 

All of the above batteries were transferred to the Coast Artillery Corps on June 8, 1905.
 
Meanwhile, the beginning of this construction program with Battery Mendell in 1901 logically would require subsequent construction of a garrison to house the men who manned the guns. The first detachment of an officer and 23 enlisted men from Fort Baker, which arrived at the Point Bonita batteries in July 1903, was forced to live in the magazines of Batteries Mendell and Alexander. Subsequently, the artillery detachment occupied several successive temporary camps. Finally on July 16, 1904, the Secretary of War authorized construction of a permanent post for two companies of the Coast Artillery Corps on December 27, 1904, the War Department designated the new post "Fort Barry" in honor of Brigadier General William F. Barry, a colonel of the 2nd Artillery who had died in 1879.
 
The garrison structures comprised basically two small complexes of buildings. The main complex was ‘aligned on the sloping hillside around a small dead end valley or ravine, the lower reaches of which accommodated a sloping Parade Ground. The structures were laid out like a backward "J" with the top of the letter to the west . Around the comer of the hillside southwest of this complex were three more buildings which constituted the quartermaster/commissary/ordnance complex.
 
In January 1905 the Quartermaster Department invited bids for construction of the twenty-one garrison buildings, all frame except the corrugated iron oil house. The buildings were finished in the spring of 1907, but the first occupants, the 161st Company of the Coast Artillery Corps, did not move in until February 12, 1908. The buildings of the new post included duplex officers' and noncommissioned officers' quarters, a twelve-bed hospital, two three-story barracks containing mess halls and kitchens, a guardhouse, a headquarters, and (around the point of the hill to the southwest) a complex of warehouses, stables, firehouse and other support buildings.
 
In 1922, Battery Guthrie was divided for better management of the weapons, and the two guns on the left flank were named on March 22 for Hamilton A. Smith, a West Point graduate killed in action at Soissons, France, during World War I in 1918. At the same time, Battery Rathbone was similarly divided, its left flank guns being named for James F. McIndoe, an engineer officer who served in France as a brigadier general, where he died in 1918.
 
As the years passed, other structures were added to Fort Barry, notably a Departmental Rifle Range begun in 1904, the flagpole and a gymnasium and post exchange erected in 1909, Battery Elmer J. Wallace, constructed in 1917 for two long-range 12-inch guns each with a 360-degree field of fire (and later casemated in 1943, a balloon hangar built in 1921which is the last of three such structures in the defenses of San Francisco to survive, used today as a stable, and Battery Construction No. 129 on the high summit to the east, completed in 1943 to contain two 16-inch guns, but never armed or named.
 
Fort Barry was without a permanent garrison from 1922 to 1941, but was regarrisoned at the beginning of World War Il when it saw a tremendous increase in military activity. There were also many World War II "temporary" structures in Fort Barry, most of them now gone, and its final defense construction was a Nike missile site, SF-88, with its three component complexes: 88A. administrative; 88C, the control site on top of Wolf Ridge in Fort Cronkhite which included the radar equipment; and 88L, the launching site.
 
Following the closure of the Nike missile site in 1974, the fort's last active military use was as a housing area for Army personnel stationed at the
Presidio of San Francisco. Today the old cantonment area serves the same purpose for National Park Service personnel and 'park partner' groups such as the Marin Center for the Arts and Headlands' Institute.
 
 
Fort Barry
by Justin Ruhge
 
In 1901 the Engineering Department prepared to construct Endicott fortifications on the coast outside the Golden Gate at the western end of Fort Baker in an area that was commonly, but unofficially, called the Point Bonita Reservation. Originally five batteries were planned. Plans and estimates for the first two batteries to be called Mendell and Alexander were prepared by September 1900. The only road to the planned construction sites from Fort Baker was by a crude five-mile long road started by Colonel Mendell in 1876 with a peak elevation of 640 feet above the water. This road was considered inadequate for the purpose. Local engineers requested funds for construction of a wharf at Bonita Cove and a single-track tramway up the 250-foot cliff to the construction site. The wharf was constructed east and 1,600 feet north of Point Bonita not far from the Coast Guard buildings. The wharf measured 208 feet by 20 feet and the pier head measured 100 by 50 feet. The deep end of the pier was in 26 feet of water. A 250-foot trestle supporting a single track designed to carry loads of up to six tons in weight was constructed.
 
A quarry was opened below the crest of the hill, and a steam-driven derrick lifted the stone 92 feet to the crusher. A 1,600-foot tramway led from the concrete mixer to Rodeo Beach for hauling sand and a 20,000-gallon water reservoir was constructed. In the winter months a steam engine pumped water to the reservoir from a gulch and in the windy summer months a windmill was used. These facilities were completed by September 1901.
 
Henry P. Christie built a special barge costing $20,000 in San Francisco with which to transport the guns, carriages and heavy materials to the Bonita Cove wharf. It was 78 feet long, 18 feet wide and had a displacement of 102.5 tons.
 
As at Fort Baker, the engineers required some temporary buildings. These consisted of an office, mess house, two bunkhouses holding 150 men, latrine, cement shed, stable for 24 horses, store house on the wharf, and a combination carpenter and blacksmith shop. This last contained a drill press and a circular saw, both driven by a gasoline engine. How times had changed since the engineers had begun constructing fortifications on lonely Alcatraz Island in 1854. The temporary character of these structures may be seen by their modest construction costs of $6, 451. None of these facilities remains standing today.
 
Work on the two batteries proceeded rapidly. In August 1902, Major General R. P. Hughes, commanding the Department of California, wrote the Adjutant General requesting coast artillery troops at Point Bonita. A detachment of one officer and twenty-three enlisted men from Fort Baker arrived at Point Bonita in July 1903, thereby marking the beginning of permanent occupation. This detachment first lived in the magazines of Batteries Mendell and Alexander. A $161 kitchen and mess room was requested for their use. Then on July 16, 1904, the Secretary of War authorized construction of a permanent post for two companies of the Coast Artillery Corps. On December 27, 1904 the War Department announced the establishment of Fort Barry in General Orders No. 194. The Fort was named in honor of Brigadier General William Farquhar Barry, a regular army artillery officer who had commanded the 2nd Artillery at the time of his death in 1879. He had distinguished himself during the Civil War, particularly in the capture of Atlanta and in the surrender of Confederate General, Joseph E. Johnston.
 
The boundary between Forts Barry and Baker was established by the true north line running from the tip of Point Diablo.
 
Despite the Fort's establishment and the transfer of the completed batteries to the artillery in June 1905, the garrison continued to consist of the small artillery detachment living in its temporary quarters near what would become the departmental rifle range. In January 1905, the Quartermaster Department invited bid proposals for the construction of twenty-one buildings at Fort Barry. All were to be frame buildings except the oil house, which was to be built of corrugated iron. The contract was let to Joseph Campbell of San Francisco for principal construction and others for plumbing/heating and wiring. The buildings were finished in the spring of 1907 but the first occupants, the 161st Company of the Coast Artillery Corps, did not move in until February 12, 1908.
 
The garrison structures comprised basically two small complexes of buildings. The main complex was aligned on the sloping hillside around a small dead-end valley or ravine, the lower reaches of which accommodated a sloping Parade Ground. The structures were laid out like a backwards "J" with the top of the letter to the west. Around the corner of the hillside southwest of this complex were three more buildings which constituted the quartermaster/commissary/ordnance complex. The buildings of the new post were as follows: duplex captains' quarters, two duplex lieutenants' quarters, two duplex non-commissioned officers' quarters, a hospital steward's quarters, a twelve-bed hospital of standard design, two three story barracks containing mess halls and kitchens, a guardhouse which is now gone, a headquarters, and around the point of the hill to the southwest, a quartermaster and commissary storehouse, an ordnance storehouse, and a bakery. There were also at one time a stable, wagon shed, coal shed, oil house, firehouse, and quartermaster shop, all gone in 1981. As the years passed, other structures were added to Fort Barry, notably a Departmental Rifle Range, begun in 1904, the flagpole and a gymnasium and post exchange erected in 1909. As presented earlier, Fort Barry was connected to Fort Baker by a road and tunnel.
 
Fort Barry was without a permanent garrison from 1922 to 1941 but it was regarrisoned at the beginning of World War II. Many temporary structures were added then but have since been removed. The Fort continued to be used by the Army in 1981; however, it has been included in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.


The Batteries
 
 
Endicott Period

 Battery Name

 No. of Guns

 Type of Gun

 Type of Carriage

 Constructed

 Completed

 Decommisioned
Mendell

 2

12 Inch M1895

 M1897 Disappearing

 1901

 1902

 1943

 Alexander

 8

12 Inch Mortar M1890

  M1896MI Mortar

 1900

 -

1941

 Guthrie

 2

6 Inch M1900

M1900 Pedestal

 1905

 -

1945

 Smith

 2

6 Inch M1900

M1900 Pedestal

 1905

 -

1945

 Rathbone

 2

6 Inch M1900

M1900 Pedestal

 1905

 -

1945

 McIndoe

 2

6 Inch M1900

M1900 Pedestal

 1905

 -

1945

 O'Rorke

 4

3 Inch M1903

M1903 Pedestal

 1905

 -

1945
 
Post World War I

 Battery Name

 No. of Guns

 Type of Gun

 Type of Carriage

 Constructed

 Completed

 Decommisioned
Anti-Aircraft

 2

3 Inch M1917
M1917 Pedastal

 1920

 1920

1945
Elmer J. Wallace

 2

12 Inch M1895A4
M1917 Long Range Barbette

 1922

 1928

 1946 (1)

(1) The construction for Battery Wallace began in 1917, but the guns were not proofed until 1928. During 1942-1943, the guns were casemated and the battery was stood down from active status in 1944.
 
1940 Program and World War II Temporary
 

 Battery Name

 No. of Guns

 Type of Gun

 Type of Carriage

 Constructed

 Completed

 Decommisioned
Anti-Aircraft No. 2

 3

3 Inch M1917
M1917 Pedastal

1942

1942

1945

Battery Construction 129

2

16 inch

 Casemated Long Range Barbette

 1942

 Not Completed

-

 Bonita

2

40mm

Mobile

-

-

 -
 

Electrical Installations
 
There was no central power plant for Fort Barry. The post power was commercial from a substation at Fort Baker. Three separate battery plants furnished power for fortifications purposes. Mendell Plant supplied current to Mendell, a type B switchboard, the mining casemate, four fire control stations, and a meteorological station. It was located in the left flank of Mendell in rooms beneath the loading platform of emplacement 2. It consisted of three 25-kw, 125 v, dc. gasoline sets. Guthrie Plant supplied current to Guthrie, Battery Alexander, Battery O'Rorke, and one fire control station. Located in the traverse between emplacements 3 and 4, it consisted of two 25-kw, 125-v, dc. gasoline sets. Rathbone Plant supplied current to Rathbone. Located in the traverse between emplacements 1 and 2, it consisted of two 25-kw sets.
 
Report of Completed Works - Seacoast Fortifications: Fort Barry Electrical Installations
 

Mine Casemate
 
The mining casemate at Fort Barry was completed in 1909. It was turned over to the troops on November 11, 1910. It was the first casemate designed and located for mining in the waters outside the Golden Gate. It was located next to Battery Mendell. The structure was 58.5 feet long by 24 feet wide. The inside was divided into a dormitory, operating room with seven panels for mine control, engine room, toilet, cabinets and storage battery room. The structure was bomb-proofed in September 1918 at a cost of $24,830. This mine casemate was designated MI and controlled the North Channel minefields. Mine casemate MII was located on the eastern side of Point Bonita. Cable hut MI stood on the eastern side of Point Bonita.
 
Report of Completed Works - Seacoast Fortifications: Fort Barry Mine Casemate and associated structures
 

Seacoast Searchlights
 
Fort Barry had four searchlights assigned. Two were located at Tennessee Point at elevations of 149 and 129 feet. Constructed in 1913, the mission of these two 60-inch lights was to illuminate North Channel, North Bank and Main Channel. Both lights were mounted on elevators so they could be stored underground when not in use. 25 kw, 125-v, dc. gasoline power supplies were used for both. These were numbered Searchlights Nos. 14 and 15.
 
A third 60-inch searchlight was located near Bird Island at 91 feet above sea level. The shelter is visible from Battery Mendell. The fourth was a 60-inch light located just below the Point Bonita Lighthouse on a narrow rock outcropping. The shelter is in a good state of repair. Both lights had independent 25-kw, 125-v. dc. gasoline powered electric generator sets. Both were built in 1913.
 
Searchlights 14 and 15 remained part of Fort Barry while control of 15 and 16 were transferred to Fort Chronkite when that post was established in 1940.
 
Report of Completed Works - Seacoast Fortifications: Searchlights Nos. 14 and 15. Information on Seach lights Nos. 16 and 17 is located under Fort Chronkite.
 
Fort Barry Searchlight No. 16, 1913. Mounted on an elevator platform so the light could be stored underground when not In use. Located on the Tennessee Point Military Reservation. Army Presidio Museum Archives, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, San Francisco.
 
Fire Control Stations
 
A two-story concrete station at an elevation of 278 feet on Point Bonita had served as the B1 S1 station for Battery Mendell. A Swasey DPF, type A II and an observation telescope were available. It also served as the BC2 B4S4 for Battery Alexander. Two World War II type stations were located north of Battery Mendell. They served as M4, Mines II, Fort Winfield Scott, and B2S2 Chamberlin, Fort Winfield Scott. Further to the northwest under a ledge of the cliff is a concrete dug-in fire control station dating from before World War II, it served as B1S1 for Battery Smith, Fort Barry. Located on Rodeo Hill were two stations that were the BC and the B1S1 for Battery Wallace. On Wolf Ridge above Battery Townsley on the lower side of the road is B1S1 for Battery Construction 129. Overlooking Muir Beach at Frank Valley are B4S4 for Battery Wallace, B2S2 for Battery Smith, M3, and Mines I. All the stations were the steel and concrete pillbox designs of World War II. At Hill 640 Military Reservation located on a high point of land between the Coast Highway and the White Gate Ranch on Panoramic Highway are five fire control stations. One of them is B3S3 for Battery Construction 129.
 
Two fire control stations were located on Wildcat in the Bear Valley area of Point Reyes National Seashore. These were the most northerly of all the stations in the harbor defenses of San Francisco. Their assignments were B7S7, Townsley, Fort Cronkhite, and B7S7, Battery Construction 129, Fort Barry.
 
Report of Completed Works - Seacoast Fortifications: Fire Control Stations
Point Bonita Lighthouse located on Fort Barry, 1930. Taken from a Navy ship. To the left of the lighthouse is the searchlight shelter and to the left of that is the Fire Control Station for Battery Mendell. U.S. Navy Photograph # 80-G 71868-2, National Archives, Suitland, Maryland.
 

Departmental Rifle Range

In 1904 military prisoners from Alcatraz constructed the first modern small arms range on the Pacific Coast. Located at Fort Barry, this outstanding piece of work came to be called the Departmental Rifle Range and troops from all posts in the Bay Area made an annual pilgrimage there for target practice. One aspect that was overlooked during construction of the range was that if a man raised his rifle too high, he shot over the backstop ridge directly toward Battery Kirby. An alarmed district engineer wrote in 1910 that some half-dozen bullets had penetrated the tin roofing over the concrete traverse of the battery. From then on no repairs or practice firing were carried on at Kirby during rifle practice.
 
 
Image courtest of the Sacramento District, US Army Corps of Engineers
 

Balloon Hangar
 
The Fort Barry Balloon hangar was constructed in 1921. This is the only survivor of the three such hangars constructed at that time. Helium-filled balloons were used for observation purposes in the firing of the larger coastal guns. One other similar hangar is known to exist on the Pacific Coast at Fort Worden State Park, Washington in 1979. The Fort Barry hangar has been used to store military equipment and horses among other things.
 
Fort Barry Balloon Hangar and Motor Vehicle Sheds: Abbreviated Historic Structures Report
 

SCR-296 Fixed Coast Artillery Gun-Laying Medium Wave Radar Set No. 5

 

Description: Fixed Coast Artillery gun-laying medium wave radar, assigned to modern 6 inch or larger batteries.

Uses: Set is designed to track a surface target in range and azimuth. Data are sent to the plotting room and used in firing. An SCR-296-A normally is assigned to one battery, but may furnish data to more. Works with IFF RC-136-A.

Performance & Sitting: Range is shown on "A" scope. The target is tracked in azimuth with a pip matching oscilloscope or a zero-center meter. Range accuracy is about ± 30 yards while azimuth accuracy is about ± 0.20 degree under the best conditions. The set has a dependable range of 20,000 yards on a destroyer size target when employed at a height of 145 feet. Site should be not less than 100 feet above sea level; 150 to 500 feet is recommended.

Mobility: Shipment includes areas and separate generator. When crated the total weight is 91,763 lbs. Largest unit is 5,270 lbs.

Installation: SCR-296-A includes a tower, an operating building, and two power plant buildings. The tower is obtainable in heights of 25, 50, 75, and 100 feet. Concrete floors must be put in locally.

Personnel: Operating crew consists of 5 men in addition to a power plant operator and maintenance man who should be available at all times.

Power: Primary power of 2.3 KW is supplied by PE-84C -- commercial or auxiliary 110 V, AC single phase. Generator needs high octane gasoline.
 
Report of Completed Works - Seacoast Fortification
Coverage Map
 
 
Battery Modifications
 

In 1943, Batteries Mendell and Alexander had their armament removed and scrapped. Battery Wallace and its long-range 12-inch guns were placed on the inactive list in 1944, only a year after modernization of the battery had been completed. In 1946, the 3-inch guns of antiaircraft Battery No. 2 were salvaged, as were the 3-inch guns of Battery O'Rorke. That fall the last of the Coast Artillery troops left Fort Barry. The four 6-inch rapid-fire batteries continued to be functional because of their mission to give protection to the minefields. When submarine mining was transferred to the U.S. Navy in 1949, Fort Barry ceased to have any role in harbor defense.
 
For a time after World War II, 40-mm guns and 50-caliber machine guns were authorized for Fort Barry. The 40-mm guns, nine in number, were stored in the balloon hangar and at Battery Construction 129. All of the 40-mm guns were removed from Fort Barry in the summer of 1946. In is unknown were the machine guns were stored.
Troop Assignments
 
A rapid buildup of Coast Artillery units at Fort Barry in 1941 symbolized the approach of America's entry into the war. All structures, permanent and temporary, at the Fort and at the new Fort Cronkhite cantonment were utilized to capacity. Personnel took stations at the guns, mortars, fire control stations, searchlights, mine casemates and the antiaircraft guns. All the Harbor Defense stations and installations at San Francisco were manned by twelve noon on December 7, 1941. On that date six batteries of the 6th Coast Artillery were stationed at Fort Barry. These were Headquarters Battery, 4th Battalion, assigned to the G-2 Station, Battery H assigned to Rathbone-McIndoe, Battery I assigned to Smith-Guthrie, Battery K assigned to Wallace, Battery L assigned to Mendell, and Battery M assigned to antiaircraft searchlights. In April 1942, Battery G, 6th Coast Artillery was assigned to the 3-inch antiaircraft guns; Battery C, 130th Coast Artillery was assigned to the 3-inch antiaircraft guns; and Headquarters Battery, 266th Coast Artillery, and Batteries A, B, C, 266th Coast Artillery assigned to the 6-inch guns. By April, Headquarters Battery, 1st Battalion, 6th Coast Artillery had taken station at Fort Barry.
 
In addition to the Coast Artillery, a battalion of infantry troops from the 7th Infantry Division was rushed to Fort Barry to prepare the beaches to the north against enemy landings. The infantrymen laid barbed wire entanglements, dug slit trenches and cleared fields of fire for automatic weapons.
 
Such modernization programs as installing fire control and surveillance radar, casemating Battery Wallace, gas proofing fire control plotting rooms, and building 16-inch Battery Construction 129 were rushed toward completion during 1942 and 1943. Battery Bonita, below the lighthouse, was armed with two 37-mm automatic weapons on mobile mounts in 1943. These were replaced by two 40-mm weapons in 1944.
 
As the war turned in favor of the allies, this success gradually reduced the garrison at Fort Barry. In October 1944 a major reorganization of the Harbor Defenses occurred resulting in reducing the Coast Artillery to three batteries at Fort Barry.
 
Headquarters Battery, 2nd Bn., 6th Coast Artillery, which had arrived from Fort Cronkhite on January 24, 1944, was redesignated the Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 172nd Coast Artillery Bn. and assigned to GATE CP. Batteries H and I, 6th Coast Artillery, which had been at Fort Barry since before Pearl Harbor, were redesignated Batteries A and B, 172nd Coast Artillery Bn. respectively. Battery A was assigned to the 6-inch guns at Rathbone and McIndoe, while B manned the 6-inch guns of Smith and Guthrie. These assignments were another reflection upon the continuing importance of the 6-inch batteries in covering the submarine mine fields.
 
Another reorganization occurred after the war, on September 15, 1945, when Battery B, Harbor Defenses of San Francisco, was assigned to Rathbone and McIndoe, and Battery C, Harbor Defenses of SF, took charge of Smith and Guthrie. On August 1, 1946 the 55th and 515th Coast Artillery Batteries replaced these units. These two batteries had a brief existence and both were deactivated on November 25, 1946.
 
In 2004, Fort Barry is an integral part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. The Marin Headlands Visitor Center is located there. The many surviving elements of the seacoast and missile defenses of San Francisco Bay combine to demonstrate the evolution of harbor defense during the twentieth century. The original post buildings illustrate an early twentieth century coast artillery fort. Here the artillerymen manned the outer line of defense of the western front through two World Wars.
 
 
References: A History of San Francisco Harbor Defense Installations: Forts Baker, Barry, Cronkhite, and Funston by Emanuel Raymond Lewis, 1965, Prepared for Division of Beaches and Parks State of California; Historic Resource Study Forts Baker, Barry and Cronkhite, by Erwin N. Thompson, 1979, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California; Seacoast Fortifications San Francisco Harbor by Erwin N. Thompson, 1979, Golden Gate National Recreation Area; Historic Fort Barry by Gordon Chappell, 1981, National Parks Service; Artillery At The Golden Gate by Brian B. Chin, 1994.
 
 
Map of Fort Barry, World War II
 
Click the above for a large view


 
Fort Barry, Circa 1910
Images courtesy of Mr. Bob Ebbeskotte
 
Medical personnel at Fort Barry, circa 1910
 
 
161st Company, Coast Artillery Corps, circa 1910
 
Fort Barry, Circa October 2000
 

 

  Enlsited Barracks. The buildings now house the Marin Center for the Arts. October 2000

 

 Parade Ground and former Officers Quarters
 

 Former post gymnasium (foreground) and World War II era chapel. The chapel now serves as the National Park Service Visitors Center. October 2000.
 
 
Army Units Assigned to Fort Barry
 

 Data Source

Date(s)

 Unit(s)
Order of Battle of United States Land Forces in the World War (1931-1949)
World War I
1st, 2nd and 3rd (Headquarters) Coast Defense Companies, Fort Barry
1st Coast Defense Company, Fort Baker
1st, 2nd, 6th, 10th (II), 14th (I), 14th (III), 15th, 16th, 17th, 19th and 50th Companies, Coast Defenses of San Francisco
US Army Order of Battle 1919-1940 1919-1922 1st, 6th and 14th Companies, Coast Defenses of San Francisco
US Army Order of Battle 1919-1940 1922-1941 11th Company, Coast Defenses of San Francisco
US Army Order of Battle 1919-1940 1919-1941
Units Performing Annual Training at Fort Barry
249th Coast Artillery Regiment (Oregon National Guard)
250th Coast Artillery Regiment (California National Guard)
 
 
Available from Amazon
 
 
Other Online or Printed Histories
 
Harbor Defenses of San Francisco - A Field Guide 1890 to 1950
Historical Resource Study, Forts Baker, Barry and Cronkhite
Quartermaster Buidling Book, Fort Barry
National Park Service
FortWiki
Wikipedia
What We Have We Will Defend: An Interim History and Preservation Plan for Nike Site SF-88L, Fort Barry, CA:
Volume 1
Volume 2
Historic Resource Study, Seacoast Fortifications, San Francisco Harbor, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California
Forts of San Francisco
A Personal Account of the Coast Artillery in the Harbor Defenses of San Francisco during World War Two
The 16-inch Batteries at San Francisco and the Evolution of the Casemated 16-inch Battery
Gun Batteries of San Francisco
Seacoast Fortifications Preservation Manual: Golden Gate National Recreation Area
San Francisco Defense Guns in World War II
 
Updated 27 December 2015